Can I put a microwave in the freezer?

The plan was to move my son from one apartment to another today. Last night I put a bunch of stuff from my house in the trailer, including a microwave oven, a toaster oven and an electric hand mixer. That's when we got the call that he can't move in until sometime later this week.
Temperatures over the next week are supposed to range from overnight lows in high 20's to the daytime highs in the 40's. Will the short-term below freezing temperatures harm any of the appliances?
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On 1/12/2013 5:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

No
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I don't think so but B4 you plug them back in and start using them, make sure there is no condensation build-up inside. Climatize them inside until they are dry.
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I meant to mention that that was the plan. Of course, that will be up to my son.
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That's what I would have written, but I'd not thought of drying. I don't think any of the appliances on that list are cold sensetive.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Hi, I don't think so but B4 you plug them back in and start using them, make sure there is no condensation build-up inside. Climatize them inside until they are dry.
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On 1/12/2013 5:29 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Put the appliance in a plastic bag then seal the bag. The plastic bag acts like a vapor barrier and keeps condensation away from appliances when you take them out of the freezer. Leave them sealed inside the bags for a few hours until they have warmed up to room temperature.
LdB
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Thanks, but if I'm going to go through all that, I might as well just bring them back into the house until he's ready to move.
I'm going to leave it up to him to allow the appliances to acclimate once he's in his new place.
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Just warm everything up for 24 hours so that any moisture has a chance to evaporate. Moisture inside a Uwave could cause some spectacular fireworks due to the high voltages around the magnetron tube that generates the Uwaves.
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Nope. Just let them warm up to room temperature before trying to use them -- biggest risk of operating them cold is that the lubricants in the motor bearings won't be very effective. There's going to be condensation, too, when cold appliances are brought into a warm environment. Once they're up to room temp, the condensation should be gone, too.
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