Can I move the ignitor closer. New ignitor but still have gas explosions

I put a new ignitor in my friend's GE gas wall oven, and little explosions started the next day, and much bigger ones later in the week.
Can I bend the ignitor bracket to get it closer to the gas?
Or might it be some other part altogether, like the valve?
We got Genuine GE Replacement Parts ignitor, 69 dollars from www.repairclinic.com .
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can do whatever you want, as long as you're not within 500 ft. of my house. Why don't you get the specs and set it accordingly.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I mounted it exactly where it was mounted before, but there are explosions.
This ignitor looks just like the previous ignitor, both Genuine GE Parts, and there are only two holes where it can be mounted, yet there are explosions..
The previous ignitor was slightly low in current used, but this one is within spec.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It sounds like the gas valve is opening ok, but the gas is not being lighted right away. If you can see or hear the igniter, try to figure out if it starts sparking as soon as the gas comes in. If it does, then the spark is not in the gas stream. By "specs", I meant the distance of the gap.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Darn. My fault. I forgot, or maybe didn't know, that the sparker is called an ignitor too.
My friend has a hot surface ignitor, and it does glow bright red, and the current flow is 2.8 amps, which is within the proper range. The ignitor is self-positioning because there are only two holes to mount screw the two screws into.
But I could bend the bracket a bit to lift it closer to the gas, I think.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you cannot fiqure out what is wrong you do need to hire an appliance repairman to come out and fix it.
Its hard over the internet to diagnose a problem...the ignitor needs to be in the gas stream....but where the proper place is depends on the oven, burner etc.....something an experienced appliance repair man will know...or at least he can visually look at the equipment and make an educated guess thru trial and error.
Once the "little explosions" started...which is called delayed ignition you should have called in someone knowledgeable...by letting this go all week with the "little explosions" getting "bigger"...you have shown yourself to be incompetant at the task and irresponsible in your actions.
you aint got no common sense.....boy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13 Jan 2006 17:46:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

My friend had a repairman in and he talked about how it might need a new valve, for 300 dollars, or a new control panel, for 300 dollars, or both. The whole oven was only 700 dollars, I think. Paid him 70 dollars or something for the service call.
But the webpages that other posters suggested here said that if there was the smell of gas or explosions, that the problem was the ignitor. So we bought a new ignitor.

I appreciate your serious answer. There were only two holes and only one way to attach the ignitor, which looked just like the previous ignitor, which worked without explosions for more than two years in the same spot.
But it does seem pretty far below the gas stream, a half inch or morefrom the flame on the occasions the burner has lit without a problem. It sounds like if I can bend it up, I should.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I you are getting explosions (and not a simple Whhoooossshhh) try contacting the manufacturer. They may have some insight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sorry, I left out:
GE model JGRP17WEW4WW. SN VZ636174Q Gas wall oven.

It's not my oven. It's my friend's and his wife used it.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm,
It really sounds as if you are in over your head and should call a repairman. As others have pointed out it could be a misplacement of the gas stream in relation to the igniter. if the igniter location is not adjustable then look at the nozzle (?) or whatever to see if you can adjust the location of the gas stream. Before you do this get in touch with the manufacturer or an expert for advice on your problem and it's repair.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

Hi, Maybe nozzle change? Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is there gas flow coming out of whatever openings are closest to it? Do you see flame there after the oven has lit? If not maybe it needs some unplugging. Could there be some other presently clogged openings that ought to have gas coming out that are closer to the ignitor?
If none of that is true and there is gas flow and there is spark right away and yet it's still not lighting til a lot of gas has accumulated then by all means get the working end of the thing a bit closer by whatever means you can.
Had the previous ignitor failed or were the symptoms the same (failure to ignite quickly)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Consider yourself lucky. You havent killed your neighbors yet. Shut if off and call someone that knows what the hell they are doing. Bubba
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It could be that the place where the igniter is sitting, the burner is clogged at that precise spot and the igniter only start the gaz after there is too much versus if the gaz was coming out at the spot where the igniter is it would start it right away thus not give that big wush (small explsion). Just a thought. In any case if it is getting worse, and you have too much of a hard time to figure it out, then get the professionals in. It is dangerous.
It could be a gaz bvalve/regulator problem, too much pressure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You are here too? http://www.newsbackup.com/about1248256.html&sidT6a72e28fb12ca576351c790ce1976d
When someone gets hurt, insurance (health/property) WILL be involved.
Some things are consumer repairable. They send you a part/devise and you plug it in or swap it out, etc. You're done.
On the front of appliance user manuals such as these, you'll find the words, _MUST ONLY BE SEVICED BY QUALIFIED PERSONAL ONLY_ or wordage just like this.
This is a money/liability/safety thing.
So be a good friend and find a top notch appliance service company to fix this properly and will charge a fair price in a fraction of the time and money this is turning out to be. If there is something dangerous, this will be obvious to the service person. Money well spent. If its the spring on your door hinge you want to replace yourself, thats one thing. However this is the about the business end of the oven.
If an adult or child gets hurt because you missed the obvious (obvious to a even a newly trained service tech) your going to regret trying to help them out in the wrong manner. Help them out in the correct manner; everything is fine from now on.
The oven, the way it is functioning now, is very dangerous. It needs to be adjusted and safety-checked.
-zero
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Consider that the electronic controls for your oven gas flow are not working properly. It sounds like you are getting gas flow too soon, before the ignitor is at the proper temperature (red hot). If your gas flow occurs before this time, then I could imagine "explosions" of lots of gas in the oven igniting. On our gas oven, the ignitor current is sensed, but then there is also a delay before the gas starts. As others have said, be careful! If you hear gas flow, but do not get ignition in a reasonable time, TURN OFF THE GAS! An oven provides a LOT of gas in a given time compared to the burners. --Phil
mm wrote:

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.