Can I cover over my existing roof?

Im planning to replace my whole roof but someone suggested me to cover the existing roof with the new one Im not sure that its good for my home or not I f you guys have some knowledge about this specific issue kindly share it with me.
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dereklawler


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dereklawler;3065483 Wrote: > I&#8217;m planning to replace my whole roof but someone suggested me to > cover the existing roof with the new one I&#8217;m not sure that > it&#8217;s good for my home or not I f you guys have some knowledge > about this specific issue kindly share it with me.
Shingling over shingles is done all the time. If I recall correctly, it's not a good idea to have more than three layers of shingles on a roof because the weight of the shingles (plus the potential snow load, I think) can get close to the roof's load bearing capacity. That's something you need to discuss with your roofing contractor.
But it's common to shingle over shingles.
I think you can also put torch down roofing over old torch down roofing, too.
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nestork


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On Tue, 21 May 2013 08:50:57 +0200, dereklawler

Can be done. If the existing shingles are not curled and the roof deck is in good shape with not leaks yet, you can do it. There is some savings for the labor and cost of hauling, but keep in mind, if you are still here for the next roof, it will be more costly to haul away a double roof.
In any case, be sure to use a good 30 or 40 year shingle. Same labor costs for the good stuff so it is a better value if you are going to live there for a while.
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On 5/21/2013 5:47 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's what I did, over twenty years ago, and it still looks great. I was told you could re-shingle over existing shingles once. The longer warranty, textured type shingles that I got hide defects like curls in old shingles.
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 08:50:57 +0200, dereklawler

Depends on the structure but most homes can withstand a new layer of roofing on top. Personally I prefer not to do this because I think the new roof is still depending on the roof underneath to a degree and if you have any rotten wood, you may not know it. This is what happened when I reroofed my home 2 years ago...discovered some rotten wood when removing the old felt paper. At the time, I did not have any leaks.
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r

y

+1 Re-roofing is a major job. The additional cost of doing a tear-off is significant, but it's not huge, maybe 10% or so. It gives you the advantage of fixing any rotting wood, inspecting and fixing the flashing. It reduces the chances of having problems with the new roof later.
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On Tuesday, May 21, 2013 1:50:57 AM UTC-5, dereklawler wrote:

cover

good for my

We had a steel roof put on over shingles and there are not dents or ripples ...even after all the walking the 4 people did up there. It's been nearly a year and has been great through the winter.
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On 05/21/13 07:56 am, Bob_Villa wrote:

ripples...even after all the walking the 4 people did up there. It's been nearly a year and has been great through the winter.
Most of the steel roofs I'vee seen are much too shiny. Are there some with a truly matte finish?
Perce
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On Tuesday, May 21, 2013 8:10:54 AM UTC-5, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Mine is light gray matte.
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 08:50:57 +0200, dereklawler

Ask the roofers bidding on the job. If any say they can cover the old roof, ask the cost difference for a tear-off. Always have 4-5 bids on the job unless you know it yourself. Don't know if the roofer population supports that where you live. Nobody here can see your roof. Personally, an extra few hundred bucks for a tear-off is worth it to me. The roofer can see and replace any rotted boards/sheets, and the new shingles will lay better and look better. Have him put in a new roof fan if you have one.
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r

y

I agree it's a good idea and I would do the tear-off. But it's more like $1000+ for the an average home. Just the cost of the disposal of the old shingles, typically a dumpster, is a few hundred bucks. The you have all the labor. And on top of that, beside what they quote you, roofing contracts have a charge of about $50 a sheet for any plywood replacement. Without a tear-off, that won't happen. With it, good chance they will find a couple sheets that need to be replaced, depending on the age of the house and that gets added at the end.
 The roofer can see and replace any rotted boards/sheets, and the

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Back in Dallas, Champion Windows did a great job on our roof. They covered by old roof with the new one. It's very common and actually adds more protection. Check out this: http://www.championwindow.com/dallas/products/replacement-windows.aspx
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wrote:

As many others have said, adding a second layer can be done but a tear- off is far better. Checking for bad sheathing, installation of ice shield, a truly flat surface, etc. can all be accomplished better with a tear-off.
In addition, some shingle manufacturers have better warranties on the same product if it is the only roof on the house and the installation instructions for the "system" - ice shield, proper weight felt or other underlayment, shingles, etc. are followed precisely.
In addition, additional layers can impact how your gutters work, how your trim fits, etc. since you are raising the height of the roof by the thickness of all the new materials.
I would get 4 - 5 quotes for both methods as well as the thoughts of those giving you quotes and then weigh the advantages of a complete tear off against the cost.
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