Can I cannect fridge to a water bottle?

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wrote:

I don't know if you mean copper or polyethylene, but I would never use the latter. They spring leaks for no apparent reason. And then they leak and leak and spray and spray until someone notices it. copper is a little harder to work with but much better.
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Yup. Last year. Pipe was from the 1950's. Works great. Steel pipe, to saddle-valve to 1/4" copper tubing to icemaker.

I've seen self-piercing valves only on copper, but the pre-drill kind work just fine on steel. You are much less likely to disturb other joints and cause leaks by using a saddle-valve rather than disassemble and put in a tee.
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PipeDown wrote:

Sure, but why use a pump? Just put the water container higher than the refrigerator so that it flows by gravity. (like in a cabinet above the refrigerator)
Don't understand why you can't run a water line to the refrigerator, don't you have water lines in the house?
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ice makers REQUIRE a REALLY GOOD FLOW!
As I found out when a bit of nothing clogged mine partially and it quit working.
The saddle valve had a problem, i disconnected the line at the fridge and flow into a bucket appeared good. after replacing the ice maker kit, solenoid valve works in fridge the service guy was called. I was here, he looked at the flow listened to my tale of woe, and replaced the saddle valve its worked fine ever since:(
The flow difference wasnt much so a icemaker on gravity feed just wouldnt cut it
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Ice makers require more pressure than that to operatoe. They are not recommended with RO systems as the pressure drop will affect them.

He has old galvanized pipe in a crawl space and does not want to tap into it until he does a fix up later. .
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He has old galvanized pipe in a crawl space and does not want to tap into it until he does a fix up later. .
You can easily run a 50 foot plastic line if you want, how about taking the connection to a better location, with galvanized he probabl;y has some copper or plastic repair areas, that would be ideal to connect to
plastic quick easy and cheap
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Didn't know that they needed a considerable amount of pressure. However, a pressure tank would easily take care of 15-40 psi.
Yep I read that he didn't want to tap into old pipes after I wrote the comment.
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Here's a low tech possibility:
Buy a new 2 gallon garden sprayer. Clean it out well and disinfect it with a bleach solution. Cut off the control valve and adapt the hose to the water inlet on the fridge. Fill it with bottled water. Pump it up and you're good to go. Every so often, give it another pump or two, it's easy to tell when the pressure is low by the effort to pump it.
Paul
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Hmm, I've been using an RO hooked to my fridge for YEARS and get consistently FULL ice half moons.
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PipeDown wrote:

If it's one of those 5 gallon water bottles, you could always let gravity do the trick by sticking it on top of your fridge.
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An interesting array of answers... I agree with the suggestion to use ice cube trays. We do, and manage to survive. It has got to be cheaper to run a water line to the fridge than to use a pump and a bottle.
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Sure it is. We can also survive with no power windows in the car but many of us sure like them. Our parents and grandparent made toast on the stove too but now we use toasters. Practicality does not always come into play.
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wrote in message

If you had to buy a generator to power only your toaster, while you had a nice hot stove nearby, wouldn't you use the stove? I have nothing against ice makers, but is absurd to hook up a pump and a bottle to use it when ice cube trays are so much easier.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

My parent's seldom make toast on a stove, whereas we always make toast on a stove when we go camping. Yep, practicality often is not a factor, the main factor is usually "desire." Put me in the category of not owning a refrigerator with an ice maker. I doubt that I ever will. To me they are only slightly above tits on a boar hog for uselessness.
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Put me in the lazy ass category. I won't be without one after having two teenagers in the house that never learned how to fill an ice cube tray.
In the next few months I plan to buy a new car. Features such as rain sensing wipers and electrochromatic mirrors carry a lot of weight in my choice.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

A much cheaper solution is to kick the teenagers out, in fact, kicking them out provides double benefits. Waiting for them to leave is a pita.
The problem with lots of convenience features is that the more you have the more possible failures that may create huge problems until fixed. For example, if my pickup stops running for some unknown reason out in the desert, it is call the wrecker time (actually wait for a passerby to call the wrecker since I don't have a cell phone). Didn't use to be that way when vehicles didn't have computer controls. But I do appreciate the increased mileage, improved power, reduced amount of maintenance, etc. of the
Electrochromatic mirrors? are these self dimming, if so that sounds good, but forget the automatic windshield wipers.
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They both left at a reasonable time. One came back for 6 months and left again. Right now I have a grandson that is on the verge of being kicked out. I do not regret having children, but life is nice now with just the two of us and no repsosibilities to others.

Yes, self dimming. Very comfortable at nigh, especially when some idiot has his high beams on behind you.
The wipers have to be turned on, but they will increase in speed if the rain gets harder or if you get sprayed by a passing truck. When you turn the wipers on (headlights also go on) they work like any intermittent but will park when there is no rain. I passed a truck going the opposite way and he sprayed by so heavy that I could not see. Before I could reach the control, the wiper made a pass.
Needed? Of course not. Anything is better than the old vacuum motor wipers used until the 50's. My next car is going to have a remote starter too. It is 20 feet to run out and start the car myself :)
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Ok, the wipers sound good too, assuming someone doesn't screw up the sensor. We don't get much rain but when it does, it seems like it constantly goes from barely to medium and everything in between. A pita to keep adjusting the timing.
Actually Chrysler Corp went to electric before 1950. Ford still had ineffective vacuum motors into the 60's. Don't know about GM. Ford was also rather reluctant to change from generators to alternators. But remote start? Don't you still have to get in the car to go somewhere?
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Sure, but it will be warmed up when I get into it. Nice feature on a below 0 morning.
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they are working on a auto drive system, get in pre warmed up vehicle, no doubt speak destination, belt on, relax read paper while your car takes you too your destination.
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