Can I add some paint to primer to give it a tint?

I have some white latex primer, and was just wondering if I can add a bit of latex brown primer (finish coat color) to give it a darker tint for the primer. That way I will only need one finish coat.
btw: Can I use latex primer on top of either oil or latex surface? finish coat is latex.
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You can have the paint store tint the primer for you. I am not sure about adding paint to the primer to tint it. You could call them and ask.
Chris
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NO ! The paint store should add the tint to the primer. Never add latex paint to oil paint or the other way around. Use oil primer over oil paint or latex. Oil based primers bite into the suface but latex primers just lay on the top.

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All he asked was" could he add brown to the white,"both latex.He wasn't asking about adding oil to latex,blah,blah,blah He can certainly darken the paint if he wants.As far as getting away with one finish coat .Why bother?you,ve got the wall ready.The second coat will add longevity to the job I see so many guys waste so much time trying to cover a wall in one coat,they could have easily done two quick coats As far as latex primer over oil,unless you go with a special primer(talk to your local paint store),I would not recommend it. Test an area ,different manufactures paint have different adhesion levels.Maybe the primer will work.As far as paint stores recommending latex primer over oil(Jim Clark)send in their names to their respective suppliers. Neither Sherwin-williams ,ben moore,ici pittsburgh,pratt lambert recommend it., Hope this helps Peter Burke

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On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 00:13:30 -0400, "peter burke"

Not true, according to the PPG and P&L dealer. If the substrate is solid and does not have a gloss, latex primers will work just fine. The only thing you would have to worry about is tannin acid bleed with a latex primer going over an intact surface.

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How many people paint their walls with flat oil?

the
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/raises hand at least if 'eggshell' counts as flat.
Fuller O'Brien Liquid Velvet Alkyd Enamel, to be specific. 25+ year durability in a house with growing children, and pets..

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The thing is, the whole point of primer is that it *doesn't* have a lot of color. You put the primer on, which has lots of binder in relation to color, so that the finish coat will stick. Paint has a lot of, uh, color dust suspended in a solvent along with a binder. The solvent evaporates, letting the binder hold the paint onto the surface. Paint over wood or other paint or metal or whatever doesn't stick so well, so you apply a coat of primer over the substrate so the paint will stick. You go adding color to that, you lose the effect of the primer.
That's my two cents.
-Phil Crow
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Phil Crow) wrote:

Yep, If you want to alter the colour then you should do it with the undercoat. You can add any colour percentage to an undercoat without losing it's characteristics.
Steve.
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Most quality primers will say on the can if they can be tinted and how much. Usually a lot less than the top coat ( 50% or less ) . If it dosen't then ask your local paint dealer not the guy at the hardware store.
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You can add in your primer. But if the two primers are from different manufacturers then you are playing alchemy and you could ruin the performance and holdout of your primer.
Latex, unlike oil base paints, is formulated diffferently from one manufacturer to the next. It is a complicated finish system, and each line of latex has its own finish recipe to make that paint work.
The way to color/tint latex prime is with the appropriate tints, usually made by Huls, Creanova or DeGussa. These are the paste colorants which the paint store measures and dispenses into the cans of paint (prior to them shaking or mixin the cans). The colorants are added into the paint in meausements of 1/48 ounce increments.
Call the manufacturer and ask them what "type" of colorant you can add into your primer, and how many ounces per gallon will be the maximum amount of color you can add. If you add too much clorant than yu can ruin the strength of the primer (which is as PhilCrow correctly stated in this thread meant to be mostly binder, the coloring coming from your topcoat).
Primers which are tinted (have color added to them) are typically tinted to only a percenatge of the final color.
Always follow the manufacturer's recommendations with latex paints. They are printed out on technical sheets. If you have doubts or questions, call the manufacturer's tech support and ask them. Never rely soley on the word of the person behind a counter, especially if that paint outlet does not carry the brand paint you are talking about.
There are guidelines with latex, and these can be generic. But each paint may have brand-specific limitations because, as I said, the complex finish chemistry which goes into formulating latexes vary from one recipe to the next. And that same needed respect is needed with any waterbase or waterborne material. -- Daniel
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