Can furnace gas valve solenoids be repaired/replaced?

I have a Trane XR80 gas furnace that started to act up recently. I narrowed down to the gas valve. It was getting 24V, but not opening. I lightly tapped it with a hammer, and it started working again.
Are these valves similiar to gas dryer valves? I had a problem with my dryer one time, and just replaced the solenoids, and was fixed. Can I do the same with a furnace gas valve? This is the gas valve on my furnace now:
http://compare.ebay.com/like/180658768877?_lwgsi=y&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar
There is a plastic cover on it which can be removed. If I remove it, will I find the solenoids?
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As a fairly new heating guy, I'd say no. I've never heard of anyone doing coils or solenoids on a furnace gas valve. I have (once) done solenoid coils on a gas dryer valve.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I have a Trane XR80 gas furnace that started to act up recently. I narrowed down to the gas valve. It was getting 24V, but not opening. I lightly tapped it with a hammer, and it started working again.
Are these valves similiar to gas dryer valves? I had a problem with my dryer one time, and just replaced the solenoids, and was fixed. Can I do the same with a furnace gas valve? This is the gas valve on my furnace now:
http://compare.ebay.com/like/180658768877?_lwgsi=y&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar
There is a plastic cover on it which can be removed. If I remove it, will I find the solenoids?
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On Dec 28, 1:45 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

solenoid valves like just about everthing else go bad. althought it may test OK contunity wise it may still not work.
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On Wed, 28 Dec 2011 08:22:48 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

Where will you find the replacement solenoids if you can get to the old ones? What will they cost you?? I'd just buy the valve and be done with it, myself - and I'm a "cheap bugger"
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On Wed, 28 Dec 2011 16:09:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Same here. The valve itself may be sticking. With gas you don't want to take chances "modifying" anything.
--Vic
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I'm with you on this one. Especially considering they don't cost much and given the possible implications if you don't get it right.
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Mikepier wrote:

http://compare.ebay.com/like/180658768877?_lwgsi=y&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar
Similar thing happened to me.
Remove the whole gizmo from the gas line and take it to Grainger's. Say "gimme one like this". For somewhere in the neighborhood of $60, you'll be good to go.
Or, you can try disassembling the thing and see if you can deduce why the solenoid won't latch. It may be something as simple as a dose of WD-40, oil, or rust removal and cleaning.
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On 12/28/2011 10:22 AM, Mikepier wrote:

http://compare.ebay.com/like/180658768877?_lwgsi=y&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar
I have repaired bad solder joints on the little circuit boards on gas valves but the solenoids I've seen in the defective valves could possibly be replaced if new ones were available but because of liability concerns, I doubt that any repair company would want to do it. You may find a simple bad connection but if there is scoring or any mechanical damage to the valve, you'd be much safer replacing the valve.
TDD
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He does open the interesting question, why they sell replacement solenoid coils for gas dryer valves, but not for furnace valves?
The OP has a Trane, which opens interesting questions. I've found that often Trane parts don't interchange with other brands, so that may be a concern.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I have repaired bad solder joints on the little circuit boards on gas valves but the solenoids I've seen in the defective valves could possibly be replaced if new ones were available but because of liability concerns, I doubt that any repair company would want to do it. You may find a simple bad connection but if there is scoring or any mechanical damage to the valve, you'd be much safer replacing the valve.
TDD
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On 12/28/2011 7:28 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Trane and American Standard are sort of like Chevy and GMC. I believe it's the same overall corporation. Trane is a division of American Standard Companies. I do believe many parts will interchange. I have an acquaintance who is an American Standard dealer and was friends with my late friend GB. I'd have to ask him for sure about the number of parts that interchange. I've serviced more Trane systems than American Standard units but they're well made and cost a lot more than the less expensive contractor/builder grade systems.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Standard_Companies
TDD
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On Wed, 28 Dec 2011 20:28:20 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

But Trane doesn't make the gas valve anyway. And it's not proprietary in any way, from what I know.
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Lets hope you're right. I don't trust Trane to make easily serviced products.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
But Trane doesn't make the gas valve anyway. And it's not proprietary in any way, from what I know.
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Thanks for everyones input.
The valve is actually a White Rodgers, and ironically the only place in my area that has one in stock is the Trane parts warehouse about 1/2 hour where I live, and pretty reasonable at $65. So I might just get it , along with an igniter as a backup, just to give me piece of mind if the valve decides to crap out altogether. With the holiday weekend coming, and cold temps on the way, the last thing I need to do is scramble around finding parts.
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Just wanted to update, I went to the Trane warehouse yesterday and got my new valve, along with an adaptor kit, which is just an extension nipple because the new valve is shorter than old one, so this nipple makes up the difference so i can use the existing gas piping. Also picked up a new ignitor as a backup. Total out the door was $127
So I'll be replacing it when I get home today. Good thing because this morning the valve acted up again and was sticking, but I got it working for now.
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If a person has the skills to do this safely, it can sure be a good experience. And a money saver. I wish you all the best. I exepct that you'll do fine. Just remembe to degauss the coil if you install the valve upside down. I know, I'll catch hell from the pros for giving away the secrets.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Just wanted to update, I went to the Trane warehouse yesterday and got my new valve, along with an adaptor kit, which is just an extension nipple because the new valve is shorter than old one, so this nipple makes up the difference so i can use the existing gas piping. Also picked up a new ignitor as a backup. Total out the door was $127
So I'll be replacing it when I get home today. Good thing because this morning the valve acted up again and was sticking, but I got it working for now.
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When the gas valve on my old Perfection furnace went bad, I had to get a sealed unit like you one you bought.
That was good from a purely safety perspective but it a took away an advantage that the old one had.
In the owner's manual for the furnace were the instructions on how to open the valve manually in the event of a power failure. You could lift a tab on the valve and lock it in the open position to turn on the gas. Because there was no blower, the suggested duty cycle was something like 10 mins on/30 minutes off.
However, since it was totally up to the user to control the duty cycle, it wasn't the safest convenience ever invented. I actually used it once during a power outage, but was never very comfortable with the practice. I shortened the On time just be safe.
I replaced the valve mid-winter. The following year we had an ice storm that took the power out for 4 days. How I longed for that "dangerous convenience" during those 4 days.
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