Can anyone estimate a replacement cost for this residential garage?

http://orebweb2.oreb.ca/mlssearch/frm_SearchMlsDetails.asp?x_mls_numc2813
It is 40x38ft, solid concrete base and sides, completed insulated loft area, steel beams, has its own furnace and 200 amps service.
secondary pictures at:
http://www.glassartists.org/Gal18932_A_new_glass_studio_is_born.asp
It actually has far more footage then the older house. I am planning to start up my glass studio abeit on a small scale initially. I know the owner 2 sales ago built it but theres some debate on how much it cost to complete. Im sure he also got 20-30cents on the dollar for the investment.
Now I will take many safety precautions prior to setting up glass including isolated a roof wall area with fireproof material and a ventilation system. Professional arrives to install propane line and tank outside for torch fuel.
That being said, wondering how much it would cost to replace if the worse did happen, excluding the insurance issue. In that case I might not involve insurance and suck it up myself. I assume a fire would leave the concrete and steel frame recoverable?
Curious as to the bottom line on replacement in a worse case scenario despite my best effort to avoid it.
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pauly wrote:

Why don't you ask local contractor? If it were where I am with hottest housing market(price goes up 5% evey month), minimum 200.00 per sq. foot. Needs it for insurance? In a severe fire even concrete/steel can melt. Having no insurance coverage would be foolish. Just my two bits. Think sprinkler system.
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If the walls and ceiling didn't have any wood structure (rafters/sheathing/studs etc), some of it _might_ be recoverable.
If it _did_ have wooden structure... Probably nothing recoverable.
A full engulfment fire on a stick frame building (with/without steel support beams) will not only turn the steel beams into twisted puddles, it'll even ruin poured concrete in basement walls/foundations.
[In a housing development fire a while back, where something like 35 just-complete/near-complete houses burned down, even the poured concrete basements had to be ripped out and replaced. Concrete doesn't like fire. A hot fire causes the water-cement chemical complex in concrete to explosively spall - surface erosion by itty bitty steam explosions. The walls may remain upright, but they'll be very badly damaged, and likely condemned as unsafe - you wouldn't be permitted to reuse them.]

As a rule of thumb, you might want to use a local $/foot construction cost for typical house construction, and perhaps use 50-75% of that (depending on level of trimout/interior finish etc) as a (very very) rough estimate.
Otherwise, get an insurance company to quote on it.
What you have sounds to be in the low-mid 5 figures to replace.
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Assume nothing. The place I worked at some years ago had a fire. Brick and block walls, Heavy beams for supports of walls and roof. Only thing recoverable was the concrete pad. Big loader just scraped up all the debris.
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