Can an oven be retro-fitted with a timed shutoff?

My electric oven has a timer, but not an automatic shutoff.
So all the timer does, is beep.
Seems to me, if I bake a cake for 350 degrees and one hour, I'd want, for safety reasons, the oven to shut off at some point too far past that set hour.
But, mine just runs forever.
Do that make an oven that shuts off with a timer? Can it be retrofitted to an existing oven?
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On 08/03/2014 2:41 PM, Clément Durand wrote:

...
I've never seen an electric oven/range since the 60s that did _NOT_ have a timed bake cycle.
Are you sure you just aren't aware of how to set it or is it really that old or so basic?
How about a make/model number?
As for the actual question, "sure it could" but it'd be a moderately complex operation for one who has to ask. Whether there's a retrofit kit for it I'd doubt seriously if that's the question.
I suppose one could buy a replacement timer assembly for a similar range and perhaps manage to mung it in place if the control panel arrangement were similar enough. Obviously one could use a standalone timer and relays and make something but that would tend to be klunky and gets back to my previous comment of "if you have to ask..."
--


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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 4:17:16 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:






plus lets say you baked a cake, set the time for 40 minutes and the heat sh ut off. but the oven is still hot. your cake will be overbaked
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On 8/3/2014 5:02 PM, bob haller wrote:

If you do it often, you know to shut the oven off at about 30 minutes.
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 4:17:16 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

plus lets say you baked a cake, set the time for 40 minutes and the heat shut off. but the oven is still hot. your cake will be overbaked
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but the house won't burn down.
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 5:18:31 PM UTC-4, Pico Rico wrote:

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I think the chances of an oven burning down the house because it was left on too long, is remote. Certainly not when baking a cake. The cake will be ruined, the house may smell of smoke (which of course itself could be a problem), but it's not going to burn the house down. For that to happen, it would have to catch on fire and the fire would have to escape the oven itself.
Agree with DPB, al the ovens I've seen, even 50 year old ones that had timers, also had the ability to do timed bake cycles. If the over doesn't it's almost certainly not going to be practical to add the capability.
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trader_4 wrote, on Sun, 03 Aug 2014 16:52:26 -0700:

It's an oven put in the house in 2000 so it's a modern oven. I will look for the owners manual as I was unaware there was a TIMED bake cycle. I will try to figure this out and if I can't, I'll ask.
Thanks to DPB for pointing this feature out, that I knew an oven needed, but which I hadn't known the ovens have.
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Cl?ment Durand:
All of the major appliance manufacturers will offer a line of electric ranges with a variety of options, from a no-frills range to one that's loaded with every feature you can ask for. I expect that all you need to do is buy a different timer (from a more expensive range) for your existing range; one that has the feature you're looking for.
You will have to compare the wiring diagrams of both your existing range with your existing timer and the more expensive range with the full featured timer. I expect that if you go to your local factory authorized service depot for your brand of range, they could both supply you with the correct timer and the wiring diagrams and give you the help you need if you want to install it yourself. You will certainly pay more for the timer buying it from the factory authorized service depot than buying it from an appliance parts store, but at the service depot you get free tech support from the appliance service technicians to help you get it installed properly. These appliance repair techs have access to the people from the factory that train technicians to repair their ranges, and those people in turn are in continuous contact with the engineers at the factory that designed the range. So, you at least have the knowledge and expertise available to you on how to swap out the timers if you buy the timer at the factory authorized service depot.
If it were me, I would start by finding out who the factory authorized service depot for your brand of range is, and then talk to the guys there about what you want to do. They'll tell you if it's feasible or not, and I expect it will be.
--
nestork

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On Sun, 3 Aug 2014 16:52:26 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

That was the one and only advantage of electric ovens. Still is, afaic
Without timers, I don't think many people who had gas available would have switched from a gas oven, which used to last forever, as long as you had a supply of toothpicks with which to clean the gunk out of the holes.
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On Thursday, August 7, 2014 1:58:03 AM UTC-4, micky wrote:

Not much of an advantage. I've had it on ovens all my life, cook a lot, and have never used it once. I guess you could use it as a backup safety, to prevent filling the house with smoke, but IMO, it's of little use for actually cooking. You typically don't want whatever it is sitting in a oven that is going to take hours to cool down. You want to take it out when it's done, particualary for anything baked, uncovered, etc. Also, getting it done right almost always requires inspection, then removal. It would best fit braising, but even then it's not a first choice of how to do it.

Electric ovens don't last? I just replaced a 27 year old one a few years ago that was still working fine. Pro chefs and serious cooks seem to prefer electric ones for the drier heat.
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wrote:

Dual fuel ranges have become popular. Electrics keep a more constant temperature than gas and they are drier since the fuel does not give of moisture like gas does.
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