Can a skid steer be used to level a gravel road

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On 11/30/2011 7:30 PM, Ignoramus27667 wrote:

http://yabe.chudov.com/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System-8975.jpg.html
I think you should try to smooth it a bit using the bottom of the bucket and dragging it backward. That way you will not dig into the hard base, but fill in the low spots. You can also use that method to move the gravel from the building side of the road back into the holes with water.
A pro can use the scoop blade and remove the hard humps in the road and make it as smooth as the parking lot in the background, but I can't and neither can you. So try the back pull method and see how that goes.
Paul
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Ignoramus27667 wrote:

http://yabe.chudov.com/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System-8975.jpg.html
As others have said, it's not the ideal machine for road grading, but it can do the job it you know how to run it. That said, a few years back I resurfaced a deteriorated ~100' gravel driveway using a regular wheeled S175 Bobcat. The driveway was solid enough, but it was rutted and had some large rocks poking up where the gravel had packed down around them.
I started by breaking up the big rocks, or at least the upper problem part of them using a hydraulic breaker on the Bobcat which worked wonderfully. After that I had a load of 3/4" gravel delivered and roughly distributed by the dump truck. After distributing the gravel around a bit better using the Bobcat bucket normally, I leveled the gravel by back bladeing with the bucket, pulling out the high spots as I moved back. This requires a lot of paying attention and manipulating the bucket height as you move since the machine tilts on the uneven surface and you have to compensate for that.
It took me about 15 minutes or so to get the hang of that bucket manipulation and the driveway still looks good today, so depending on your skill level with the machine, it's not an impossible project. I'll note that I did not do anything to disturb the well compacted base beyond decapitating those few big rocks. I didn't have any drainage issues, the driveway had a modest slope in the proper direction anyway. You will need to more carefully look at the slope and where you can drain water to. It may be a case where you really need to install some drain pipe, even the basic filter fabric wrapped 4" flex stuff in order to collect water heading towards the building and move it to a proper drain area.
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When you need the weight of the machine you have to do it that way, but on final grading you can use "float mode". When you push the height control pedal all the way down it should click in and allow the bucket to float up and down for back grading. Hit it again and it will release.
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ATP wrote:

Float mode won't do a lot to level out fresh gravel, you have to be able to hold the blade at the desired grade high (compensating for machine tilt) to level it out. Float mode will just apply bucket weight wherever it is and on freshly deposited gravel which is all pretty much at the same density it will just ride the contour scraping a bit off of both high and low spots.
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http://yabe.chudov.com/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System-8975.jpg.html
Is it actually all gravel, or is it mixed with asphalt binder? You can grade gravel with a skid steer, but bringing more gravel in and spreading it would probably give you a better result. If you disturb the material that's there now it will take a while for it to pack back down and you may see more rut's, etc.. Also, an appropiate mix of gravel and fines will pack down pretty well, all one size will not compact.
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"Ignoramus27667" wrote in message
I have a gravel road that deteriorated, has huge puddles when it rains, and the water enters the building from the side.
http://yabe.chudov.com/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System-8975.jpg.html
The problem, I think, is that the slight grade that is there, is kind of ruined and so the water does not go down along the road towards the rain sewer. Instead, it puddles and some goes into my building.
Can this skid steer pictured here:
http://igor.chudov.com/misc/ebay/tmp/Takeuchi/291.JPG.html
be used to rearrange that gravel a little bit to restore the grade?
Or is it too light duty?
thanks
I used a York Rake on the back of a four-wheeler to smooth out a bluestone driveway. A few passes and it was like new.
JAS
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Iggy asked:

Ig... so far (unless I missed it) nobody has hit on the basic reason for your problem.
Unless the gravel is bound by some cementaceous substance, re-grading the gravel won't do a thing for your water drainage. Gravel is highly pourous to water -- it's used in things like percolation fields and French drains to allow water to enter without allowing larger debris to penetrate.
Re-grading the gravel won't cure the underlying problem: And the problem TRULY "underlies" the gravel.
Scrape ALL the gravel aside, and re-grade the earth below it. THEN replace and smooth the gravel, and you'll be fine.
LLoyd
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On Nov 30, 10:30pm, Ignoramus27667 <ignoramus27...@NOSPAM. 27667.invalid> wrote:

I haven't read all the replies, but here is my take..............
First you need to clean up the side of the building and bring in dirt to raise that part next to the building so water will be shunned away from the building and onto the drive, then out to where it is suppose to run to (ditch or sewer). After building up the area next to the building, then the drive can be sloped away from the building. This will help in future potholes. Nothing will stop potholes entirely other than paving.
Building up the drive and not the area next to the building will only mean more water into the building. You have to give the water a path, that is lower than the building.
The skidster in th epic is plenty big enough to do the job you want done.
Hank
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you dont want to raise ground level higher than the bottom of the buildings sill or risk rotting out the buildings sill
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If you look at the pic, it appears to be all masonry. There is no sill plate.
Hank
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On 12/2/2011 9:19 PM, bob haller wrote:

Brick and block building, Bob, which may have some wood framing in the office area. There should be weep holes in the exterior brick, one course lower than finish floor to allow moisture out of the wall. Exterior grade should begin at or below the bottom of the weeps and drop 1/2" per foot for the first 10' according to code. This is often not done - I don't know why as it should be. Ig needs to get the water away from the building whether it goes to a drywell, an evaporation detention pond, or pipes to daylight or storm. The cheap things to do are to arrange surface drainage away from the building.
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