Can a skid steer be used to level a gravel road

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I have a gravel road that deteriorated, has huge puddles when it rains, and the water enters the building from the side.
http://yabe.chudov.com/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System-8975.jpg.html
The problem, I think, is that the slight grade that is there, is kind of ruined and so the water does not go down along the road towards the rain sewer. Instead, it puddles and some goes into my building.
Can this skid steer pictured here:
http://igor.chudov.com/misc/ebay/tmp/Takeuchi/291.JPG.html
be used to rearrange that gravel a little bit to restore the grade?
Or is it too light duty?
thanks
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Depends on the skill of the operator. I've had a good Bobcat guy do a couple of very long mountain driveways with roadbase and they turned out very well. If you were thinking you could do the work yourself, I'd be a little concerned.
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I have never operated a skid steer.
i
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wrote:

Were you intending to use said skid steer, or do you have an operator in mind? If it's you, I'd advise against it. You'll dig it up really good. Worse than now. If it is another operator, it all depends on that operator. I think if you do get it level, you will have the same puddling problem. Bring in fill.
Steve
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On 11/30/2011 11:22 PM, Ignoramus27667 wrote:

I agree with Robert Neville, the machine is capable, but only with a qualified operator. Skid steers are very back heavy to compensate for the lifting weight. Because of that it's difficult to use down pressure to do grading or back blading. Personally I've found it much easier to do with a compact 4WD backhoe loader.
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http://yabe.chudov.com/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System/Enterprise-Dust-Collection-System-8975.jpg.html
Call for a truck or three of gravel and spread it out.
Done.
Quickly.
Steve
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On 11/30/2011 10:22 PM, Steve B wrote:

NO This is probably why he is having the problem. If you just raise the exterior grade without making provision for drainage you are just compounding the problem. I would imagine that the building has weep holes one or two bricks below finish floor. This becomes the highest possible point for exterior grade - everything else has to be below that.
Looking at the picture, the first thing I would do would be to clean out and kill all the vegetation along the exterior wall. Dig down and verify existence of weep holes. Find the finish floor elevation and establish it somewhere on the outside so you can shoot grade in relation to finish floor. 30 minutes with a builder's level and driving some grade pins should determine where to send the water. I would almost venture to say that you may be removing some material rather than bringing any more in.
Ig, the machine is capable and would make a great outdoor fork lift, power broom, etc. The grading results would be VERY dependent on the operator.
___________________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . Dan G
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wrote in message

The large bucket and short wheelbase of my tractor magnify the difficulties of grading. When the front wheel drops one inch the bucket edge drops two which amplifies the irregularities of the surface, like the self-sustaining washboard pattern on a dirt road. I've watched a fairly experienced Bobcat operator struggle to overcome this.
Mine has no downforce and floats on frozen ground on skid plates so it's fine for clearing snow or moving piles of dirt, but almost useless for excavating and grading.
jsw
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wrote in message

My experiences operating them and watching operators is about the same. They dig too much, and the wheelbase is too short. What I did see that impressed me was a track bobcat with a thumb/bucket boom and a blade who made short work of an uneven area I had. I was not optimistic when he started, but man, he kicked the job out of the park in no time. Similarly the same machine, but using a blade to bulldoze instead of a bucket that goes up and down with whatever the tracks run over.
Steve
Steve
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This is my thinking exactly, that adding stuff to the road is the wrong solution. I think that the road needs gravel removed or moved to the side.

Thanks. I will sell it for sure, since I need money. however, my thinking goes, I need to get some work done with it, so I can get some use out of it and then sell.
i
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On 12/1/2011 1:23 PM, Ignoramus19744 wrote:

...
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First you have to establish as Dan says the needed grade level then where does the water have to go to get away from the building. It looks quite flat in general; it may well be there never was any real consideration for drainage w/ every lot being built sequentially up to put their runoff onto the boundary and the heck w/ the end result to elsewhere. Is that alleyway a city easement or purely private property might have a bearing on whose job it is to reestablish grade on it if it isn't just access to the rear of your building for your use alone but is trash pickup, etc., etc., etc., ...
--
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Dan, I have reviewed your lucid response, and will now make it my own with your permission.
It is very difficult to tell a lot from just a picture, not seeing the thing, and not knowing your weather conditions, etc.
I think the PROPER way to fix it would be possibly to either make a lengthy French drain with natural drainage if available, and if not, a sump pipe with pump that will pump out water that seeps in.
If you are going to get serious about this at all, you might even consider at some time concreting it so a hard wheeled forklift (3500# cap. variety) could be used for loading/unloading.
Maybe after the first million. And don't count on PowerBall, I got the winning numbers.
Steve
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I went to the auction site to pick up the skid steer.
Turns out that the skid steer that I won, was "accidentally" sold to someone else, and the auctioneer tried to give me another one, hoping that I would not notice.
That another one had 4500 hours on it, whereas the one that I was bidding on, had 2,600 hours on it.
I explained to the auctioneer that it is like marrying a 26 year old girl, who, upon closer inspection, turns out to be 45 year old.
Not quite a minor difference!
In the end, they refunded me.
i

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$13,500
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 06:13:14 -0600, Ignoramus8791

Okay, he refunded the bid - And he paid you how much for your lost time and effort, and the gas and vehicle expenses to get your little trailer hitched up and come pick it up, only to find out it was "accidentally" (BullF***ingS***) sold to someone else?
Not to mention the opportunity cost of the other bids and buys you didn't make elsewhere because you thought you had that one locked up.
That's not a little Oopsie you can easily dismiss. You'd be well within your rights to shout to the heavens and literally go after the guy's balls - he's got state licenses, professional association memberships, and Auctioneer's Surety Bonds you can go after...
In that business you don't "have accidents". You bid $13,500, and someone probably walked up to him after the auction and made a better offer to drive it away today, and he (or an employee) did it. I want to know names, so I never go anywhere within three states of this outfit.
You would be well within your rights to make him cough up the goods as represented, Period. Or a significant amount in damages to cover your losses in this transaction.
And please don't tell me you signed a full release to get the refund.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On 2011-12-03, Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)

He paid me nothing for that, but I aM ok WITH IT.

I think that it was an honest fuck up, at least up to the point when I showed up. And when I did show up, possibly, he tried to cover up his mistake.

I am not, yet, ready to decide that it was a deliberate deception from the beginning.

It is very hard to get damages for a failed transaction of this sort. Possible, but under special circumstances such as when "time is of the essence".

I just got a refund.
i
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How convenient for the auction house. No paper trail. Ends with your refund, which has to be explained to no one. No complaint filed. Case closed, and money deposited from actual buyer.
Steve
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And they potentially made a lot more selling the same item to someone else, and Iggy lets them off for free. Great day for the auctioneer if they can pull stuff like that off every day with no consequences.
Iggy potentially lost thousands on the deal. He could have used it for his paving project, put in a little effort into cleaning it up, then resold it for a serious profit - that will never happen.
--<< Bruce >>--
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I would at the very least file a complaint with the BBB. Also check BBB to see if any other complaints were filed.
Hank
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On 12/3/2011 3:22 PM, Hank wrote:

BBB is right up there with chamber of commerce as a useless historical artifact.
--
aem sends...

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