camera copy stand

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I want to make a camera platform(out of wood) so that its height can be adjusted on a 1" thick dowel-sort of home made camera copy stand.I used oak but it too hard to hold onto the dowel without slipping.
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Make a giant clothespin
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what kind of wood do you recomend?
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wrote:

Martha Stewart would say, wrap the dowel with hockey tape. (Tennis racket grip tape or whatever)
The sporting goods store is your friend here.
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I've read this 6 times and I still haven't got clue 1 about what the hell you're talking about.
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wrote:

I think he just wanted to share his experience with us.
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check craiglist , garage sales etc for camera tripod.
easier than making it, folds into aa tiny space easy to transport and looks profesional........
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On 10/06/2012 05:05 AM, bob haller wrote:

I bought one of the cheap ones from amazon about 10 years ago, and for my rare, occasional use it's still working just fine. Checking on Craigstlist does indeed show several used models, starting at $10.
Jon
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Would this work:
'RULAND MANUFACTURING Quick Clamp Shaft Collar, 1In Bore - Shaft Collars - 5DFH5|QCL-16-A - Grainger Industrial Supply' (http://tinyurl.com/9z5lrj2 )
It's an anodized aluminum collar with a 1 inch ID. It uses a cam lock for quick locking and unlocking. It's about $36.
--
nestork


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On 10/5/2012 7:45 PM, Freddy Correa wrote:

Drill a series of holes in the 1" dowel for a smaller dowel (say 1/4" or so) that would rest on the stand's top plate. No holding necessary.
Now how you get a camera attached to the top of a 1" dowel is an excuse for another off the wall post.
John
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On 10/5/2012 7:45 PM, Freddy Correa wrote:

of options for friction clamps that will grab the pipe without slipping. You can mount the bottom of the pipe to the wooden base of the copy stand using a threaded mount with a flange that has a bunch of holes in the base. You'd screw the flange to the base of the stand with wood screws.
I'd use a metal pipe instead of PVC because the friction clamps are much more likely to damage a PVC pipe than one made from brass or galvanized steel. Copper pipes might be too soft.
Depending on the weight of the camera, you might be surprised how heavy and wide the stand might need to be to avoid it either shaking or falling over when the camera is near the top end of the pipe. You may want to C-clamp the base of the copy stand to the sturdy table you'll need to put it on.
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Freddy,
Ok, here's what I get. You have a table (with lights?). You have a 1" dowel sticking up from this table. You want to slide a piece of oak on this dowel. The piece of oak will have a support for a camera. 1 inch dowel sounds rather small to me but try it and use bigger if necessary. Glue (and maybe nail) a collar to the underside of the oak platform. The dowel will pass through the collar and the platform, a tight but not binding fit. Drill and tap a hole through the collar and get a winged set screw.
Dave M.
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Thanks guys for all your replies, I have tripods but a photocopy stand is better,I have lots copying to do(digitize) of photo,poster,slide and negative film . I'm using my buddy's $2,000 Nikon camera, I don't want to drop it.A decent photocopy stand costs about 200 from B&H, I got pipe,dowels and clamps time to use your ideas,thanks again.
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wrote:

PV's link shows a decent one-- I'd also poke around estate sales for darkroom equipment-- I picked up the vertical hardware for $5 a decade or so ago-- I *still* haven't gotten around to making it into a copy stand.<g>
Jim
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On Saturday, October 6, 2012 11:36:52 AM UTC-4, Freddy Correa wrote:

I haven't read all the replies so someone may have already said this, but for photo prints up to say 11X17, a $100 flatbed scanner will give you better results than the $2000 camera (though not as fast if you have really high volume).
Unless he has a parallax-corrected lens for copying documents you will get some distortion...and probably lower resolution if you care. Getting even lighting without reflections is also an adventure that the scanner won't take you on.
If you're just taking pictures for inventory purposes or of things to sell on ebay, you probably don't care about the above.
A good, slide/negative scanner or something for large posters is more expensive.
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On 10/5/2012 7:45 PM, Freddy Correa wrote:

With a $2K camera, the focus adjustment should just about do it. Can you put the post of your tri-pod upside down? Rather than adjust height of camera, why not make the document platform adjustable with a threaded rod or table top tripod?
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wrote:

No, focus is for focus. Unless you have a zoom lens, distance is what must be changed to fill the frame the way he wants.

I've done that.
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On 10/6/2012 11:23 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A previous respondent's comment in this tread has a good point - a flatbed scanner might be a better solution if the OP is copying 2 dimensional objects. With even inexpensive OEM scanning software, you can frame (crop) the scan to fill the image file with the area of interest and still have enough resolution in that file to tweak crop the full frame image produced by the scan a little bit if needed and still get very good quality 8x10 prints. I bought my Epson 3170 flatbed 5-6 years ago and found it to be an excellent value. I've probably used it to make more than 10,000 image files and it works as well as when I first got it.
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Scanners work with 3d objects, too. Just drape them with black cloth.
But they are painfully slow- and if the point is just to preserve an image, I'd go with a camera.
-snip-

Aside from the pictures I've taken with it-- I'll bet I've copied 100,000 book pages [many of them were books in library archives where no flash or scanning was permitted].
Jim
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