Calling all painters!

I have the following situation: mudroom originally painted with oil based paint. In a need to do things in a hurry (still kicking myself) I painted over with latex. Not a real problem until the kids came along and started making washing the walls a necessity. Now the latex is coming off.
I want to repaint, starting from primer out, so what primer can I use (latex or oil) that will correct the existing problem and be a good base for a new coat(s) of latex?
Thanks
Edee Em I know the truth is out there, but I like to stay in....
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None. First thing you are going to have to do is to get the latex off and sand the gloss off the oil base. If it is old I would be concerned about lead in the oil base. Consumer Reports is loving Behr paint these days. I would call them and see what they suggest you put on top of the oil. There are lots of controversy over this since oil and latex move at different rates.... some people think latex will never do well over oil.

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Behr? Not a fan of Consumer Reports. Talk to the paint shops and see what they prefer. Frazee is my fave and I've heard the painters like another. Can't remember the name off hand. Not Behr though.
You readers of C.R. Ever notice that in the subjects you feel you know something about that they are always off base? Sure makes me wonder.
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I've found that paints go up and down in quality as companies try new technologies. Right now Behr appears to be up.

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Sorry ed , you wont fix it by going over it you already sealed yourself into a problem. Get alcohol its latexes remover and wet it and get it off . If the smell is to bad wet an area then mix up warm water with strong tsp and keep wet till soft. Use a wide blade knife. If it is only hand height it indicates it was dirty and oils from hands have prevented adhesion. Scrape from top to bottom to see where it is the worst. You may just use a 4" blade depending on how well its on. And remove what is loose. If you do primer and maybe several coats it may last if your kids are carefull. But your latex is the problem , so a new primer wont fix what isnt bonding. If its Hand height and just a several foot band then Alcohol and soap work fast. If its real bad then just a scraper will work. If you seal it in it will come off with further hitting. Denatured alcohol in a gallon or that cheap Vodka you hate will work. Once you get it off sand lightly with 100-180 prime with a good bonding primer and paint.
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After reading your post, I think I'll need the alcohol! Oh well, time to pay the piper for mistakes of the past. If you don't hear from me for a while you know where I am!!

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snipped-for-privacy@cogeco.ca says...

it with a palm sander. It will be necessary to scuff up the gloss on the old oil paint. Here's what I suggest:
1. Test old oil paint for lead. If it's positive, get a professional to deal with the situation.
2. Presuming no lead, use a palm sander and ~100 grit paper to buzz off the old latex (should just pop off quickly) and roughen the surface to make it ready for the next coat. WEAR A RESPIRATOR!
3. Now begin coating with a suitable primer for the existing oil with whatever your next coat will be.
Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
Marc
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Good suggestions, but what primer would you recommend?
says...

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If the surface is clean and deglosed and sanded you dont need to prime if using a quality paint. If it covered 1 coat before and no bare compound you could even brush on an area and test bonding after a few days. But since you washed and sanded you will be ok i will bet
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I disagree. A nice job requires primer. The better primers are labeled that they are made for glossy paint. However those are also the best for semi gloss and matte. They are just more expenisve and that is why they are labled for glossy paint. At least that is what Behr told me when I called them and asked.

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He has washed and sanded the walls no primer is necessary unless not preped right or cheap paint is being used or walls were repaired. A good sand and wash is what everybody forgets till it fails. But if it is a heavily hit area oil finish would be best latex just doesnt have the hardness of oil, or washability.
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