call blocker device suggestions?

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OK, I see landline solutions but what about cell phone solutions I am on Sprint. Samsung Galaxy S5 lollypop. Is there a forum that will cover that if someone here has no good solution. Thank you!
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OldGuy wrote on 3/29/2015 10:55 AM:

try comp.mobile.andriod
Seems to be a good amount of traffic in there.
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On 3/29/2015 10:55 AM, OldGuy wrote:

Not needed here.
Four cell phones in the house and none get unwanted calls. Maybe one in a year. It is still illegal to call for telemarketing.
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Per OldGuy:

I have been using what my phone lists as "Call Control v3.1.18.2" for a couple of years now and my cell phone telemarketing/robo calls have dropped by at least 90%.
Just checked Google Play, and it looks like they have changed the name to "Call Blocker - Blacklist App" viz <>https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.flexaspect.android.everycallcontrol&hl=en
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Pete Cresswell

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On 3/29/2015 9:55 AM, OldGuy wrote:

When you're at home, put your cell phone on call forwarding to your landline.
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Per bill ashford:

I have heard good things about a service called NoMoRobo, but it requires that you phone service support something called "Simultaneous Ring". We have the most el-cheapo basic phone service and I am too cheap to pay more, so I do not have experience.
Another option (which I am toying with) is going over to a VOIP provider for phone service.
I already have all outgoing, except 800, calls going out on VOIP.
If I were to switch the incoming over, I could use a service provided by my VOIP provider (CallCentric.com) that prefixes every incoming call (except those on a GoldList that I maintain) with an announcement like "Please press 3 to talk with somebody...".
I figure robocallers won't be able to deal with that challenge-response situation... at least for a few years.
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Pete Cresswell

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On 03/29/2015 11:47 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
[snip]

I have had one of those challenge-response things. It didn't do much better than just an answering machine.
A few of the people who called me would press the button. Most wouldn't, so I would still need to have the phone ring so I could get the caller ID and answer (pressing the key for them).
I didn't have an exception list like you did. It would still be a problem (new important callers who won't press the key).
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If you have digital voice through Verizon, go to NOMOROBO.com and sign up.. No charge and they are very good in blocking calls.. I've been using them 2 years and they work great..
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"bill ashford" <billa! snipped-for-privacy@top.com> wrote in message
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On 3/29/2015 11:50 AM, sharkman wrote:

Verizon digital also has a spot where you can enter up to (10?) phone numbers to block. You don't even get one ring.
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On 3/31/2015 2:17 PM, John S wrote:

The works if you want to be rid of an ex-wife or girlfriend. The telemarketers use different numbers very often and you really don't get a lot of repeats.
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On 3/31/2015 3:11 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But you can only block 10 ex-wives. :(
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John S wrote:

mobile phone. I gots a land line to protect...i do not give a sh*t about a stupid mobile line..
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On Thu, 02 Apr 2015 02:27:09 -0800, Robert Baer

Sorry, that is not correct.
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On Thu, 02 Apr 2015 02:27:09 -0800, Robert Baer

You should be better educated on a topic before you propagate incorrect information. Nomorobo definitely DOES work on land lines, period.
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wrote:

Something is wrong here. I may get a few "dead air" type of phone calls, but most of them have a recorded robotic voice that appears when I say something or when I pickup the line. Telemarketers might be evil, but they're not stupid. They would not waste the cost of a call just to deliver "dead air". Certainly not for 4 years of "dead air". Something is wrong.
My guess(tm) is something is wrong with your Verizon POTS line that is initiating a ring, but not completing the call. I've seen this with some electronic phones, where there is sufficient crosstalk in the wire bundle to pickup some of the ringing voltage from other lines in the bundle. However, those don't also pass Caller ID numbers and only ring a few phones in the house, so that's not a likely failure mode. Unless the provisioning is mangled or the Verizon switch has gone insane, I can't guess(tm) what might be causing the calls.
I was thinking it might be a fax machine trying to send a fax repeatedly, but that would be from one phone number and certainly not for 4 years. You would also hear a tone as the originating fax machine tries to negotiate the call. Are the numbers shown on the Caller ID all identical or perhaps similar as from a calling group?
I assume that you've contacted Verizon. Changing your phone number might be an obvious option that I'm sure they would have suggested. If the problem persists, it's a hardware or switch problem. If it goes away, problem solved.
On the other hand, the vague problem description, improbable symptoms, and odd selection of crossposted newsgroups leads me to suspect that this is some manner bad joke or time burner. Please assure me this problem is real by posting some details.
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On 3/29/2015 8:12 AM, bill ashford wrote:

Using a "SIT tone" might help:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_information_tones#Other_uses "In telephony, a special information tone (SIT) is an in-band international standard signal consisting of three rising tones indicating a call has failed. It usually precedes a recorded announcement describing the problem " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_information_tones#Other_uses "Because many predictive dialers (used in telemarketing) respond to SITs, consumer devices such as the TeleZapper play an Intercept SIT to trick the telemarketer's equipment into flagging a called number as disconnected.
Alternatively, the above recordings of SITs could be used on a voicemail or answering machine, or played manually on a computer, to achieve a similar effect."
Susan
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Tried this method for a few months with very limited success. Switched to nomiribo and mostly eliminated my problem. Bought a $90 Teleblocker and problem totally solved.
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bill ashford wrote:

Assuming USA, assuming landline. Add sit.wav to the beginning of your answer message. It cut robo calls by about 30%. Some robo calls go right to a recorded message and never hear the sit.wav though. Or just use sit.wav as an answer message and nothing else. Doing that not only confuses robo machines but confuses humans, too, and they hang up.
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On 03/29/2015 12:34 PM, Paul in Houston TX wrote:
[snip]

And you don't get calls from real people you want or need to talk to.
Anyway, I've been hearing about this use of SIT for a long time now. Wouldn't the robocaller machines been adapted already?
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Mark Lloyd
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On 3/29/2015 12:18 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

People who *know* you and your practices adapt easily.
Where you get screwed is the folks who contact you only occasionally. Or, who may "vary" with each contact (e.g., someone calling from your doctor's office, the public library, a friend who's forgotten this idiosyncrasy, etc.)
That;s why its better to engage them interactively. Someone from your doctor's office is more likely to "comply" with some minor inconvenience in contacting you ("Please press 3") than they would "remember" the service disconnected message.

If you answer on a low ring count, there's no real way they can differentiate between a genuine message and a spoof. And, what do they do if they *suspect* it isn't genuine? Remain on the line and see if the message repeats? Or, if the connection is dropped?
Ideally, you are "listening" during the outgoing message (announcement) so legitimate callers can short-circuit the message and get to the *real* answering machine (or, cause a ring-thru).
While most of these firms are annoying, it really wouldn't be *smart* for them to persist. If you've gone to these lengths, it's because you are UNLIKELY to ever accept any of their "offers".
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