Calculating weight distibuted on concrete slab with pool on top

I have been using my Intex Ultra frame pool for the past few years on my concrete slab in my backyard and was just curious what is the actual weight distributed on the concrete.
The pool is 14 feet round and holds 3,300 gallons of water. A gallon of water weighs 8.35 pounds, so that equates to 27,555 pounds on the slab.
Calculating the area of the pool, radius^2*PI= 49*3.14= approx 154 ft/sq
So if I divide the weight of the water by the square footage:
27,555/154= 179 lbs per square foot.
Meaning there is 179lbs of weight per square foot on the slab, correct?
How does this relate to the standard strength of concrete? Is it usually 3,000 PSI?
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 10:45:13 AM UTC-4, Mikepier wrote:

I think it's one more math step. A sq ft is 144 sq in. 179/144 = 1.2 PSI.
Whatever the performance of the concrete is, I think in that application it's irrelevant. What's going to determine if anything happens is going to mostly be:
1 - The stabilized (hopefully) base that it was poured on. By far that the most critical.
2 - That the slab is the correct thickness. I guess the strength of the concrete would come into play there too, but I would think you're better off with typical concrete at 4" thick, than extra strong concrete at 2" thick. Whether it has rebar or similar would be a factor too.
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If there is a standard, it is probably shown on line at the US National Bureau of Standards.
179 lb. per square foot seems safe and normal. Lots of people weigh 179 pounds and the bottom surface of their shoes totals less than 144 square inches.
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Don Phillipson
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On 3/10/2015 10:45 AM, Mikepier wrote:

Probably easier in most cases to just measure the depth of water & multiply by 62.4 lb/SF (in your case 2.87' of water.)

I gather the pool puts a uniform compressive load on the concrete slab. Concrete is strong in compression but relatively weak in tension.(it doesn't bend well). if the ground under the slab provides uniform support but is weak/compressible the entire slab may sink. If the ground support is NOT uniform the slab may crack but cracking is more likely to be caused by loads that are NOT uniform - cars and trucks for example.
Susan
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Matters not the area of the pool. Use the depth of the water to calculate the load (in^2, Ft^2). The reality after two years the damage is done/not done. If damaged you may need to fix when the pool is removed. If not damaged you have no problem
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