C.O. alarms !...

Bubba N.Y. S. Code section1225. Carbon Monoxide Alarm States : The required carbon monoxide alarm shall be installed in the immediate vicinity of the bedroom(s) on the lowest floor level of the dwelling unit containing bedroom(s)
Subject: Re: CO Detected Date: Friday, December 24, 2004 1:40 PM
>Several comments. NIOSH exposure level is 50 ppm (level at which worker can >be exposure to continuously) so 14 is not a problem by itself. I would >move the detector around the house to see what is the source. Check the >heated air from the furnace to see if there is a leak in the plenum. Take >the detector outside if not too cold and see what its zero level is. I >assume a gas stove will put out a small amount of CO since it vents into the >house. >
You know, Im almost shocked by some of the comments Im seeing posted in here about CO. Im just going to assume that there is much unknown advice to the average homeowner about CO? You would have to be absolutely NUTS to knowingly expose yourself to 50ppm of CO continuously! Even 14PPM! Below is a level that may be safe (009 PPM) but I still wouldnt knowingly expose myself to that or any other level
ASHRAE 62-89 (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers) 009 PPM The maximum allowable concentration for continuous (24 hr) exposure. ASHRAE states the ventilation air shall meet the out door air standard referenced to EPA and 9 PPM.
You also, for the most part, cannot use a household CO detector to detect a CO leak in a furnace plenum. The amount of air from the blower in the furnace dilutes the CO so much that it takes a long time and/or large concentration for your detector to register the CO. Your assumption of a gas stove putting out CO is incorrect also. If it is putting out CO it is burning poorly or it is causing incomplete combustion. If it is, GET IT FIXED! Dont rely wholy on your UL listed CO detector. Read the info. See what kind of levels your detector alarms at. You might find it "alarming". Bubba
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
al wrote:

One also needs to recognize that some (if not all) consumer CO alarms may not detect below 11 ppm. The instructions on my Nighthawk also say that it won't display between 11 and 29 unless you punch the max level button. So normally you wouldn't even know if the level got as high as 29 and will never know if the level is between 0 and 10 ppm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bottom line if you read more than Zero it is worth investigating. Zero is a safe level, 14 indicates a problem that longterm Is bad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 06:04:51 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Well, Im glad someone is following along and understanding. Bubba
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So just what are you trying to state? If the bedroom is in the basement, its getting a CO detector. If the bedroom is on the 4th floor, its getting a CO detector. If my CO detector reads more than 0, Im going to investigate why? Its really not that hard. Bubba
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.