Bypass fan remote control unit?

We would like to buy a Hampton Bay fan but the one feature of the fan we do not like is that it is a "remote controlled" fan, meaning that in order to allow the fan to be operated from a wall-switch, the switch has to be one of the rather unattractive Hampton Bay units and whose battery needs to be replaced once a year or so. There is also the issue that the remote unit inside the fan housing is "always on" and wasting electricity. Yeah, it's a small amount but it still irks me.
What I want to know is if it is possible to remove the electronics for the remote system and simply run the fan from a normal light/fan switch combination. The box in the ceiling is already wired for a traditional fan with separate hots for fan and light assembly.
Has anyone done this?
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When the remote stopped operating on a fan my father owns, I just rewired and operate it without the remote. He liked the remote, but balked at the replacement cost. The fan works fine and I don't think there would be much difference in the wiring for different brands. I haven't done this with a Hampton bay fan.
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The remote control receiver should have three outputs (or perhaps four) -- one for the light, one for the fan, and one neutral. If you have a multimeter, you can test which is which and just remove the RC receiver and wire directly to the switches.
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On Sun, 23 May 2004 07:41:42 -0600, David Gunter

If it's like my Hampton Bay w/remote, the remote receiver is located in the cup that the lights mount to. The lights wire directly to the receiver, but it would be simple to rewire them. The receiver module has a 9 pin connector that brings in the power and motor connections. I assume there are so many connections because the remote can select fan speed and direction.
Note, there is no manual direction switch, nor a speed switch on the fan, since those functions are performed by the remote.
The connector is not marked as to what pins are for what function. I imagine a few minutes experimentation with a meter would enable you to figure out what the wires are for. At a minimum, you are going to have to snake a third wire through the fan body because there are only two wires (white and black) now.
If you're handy with electrical stuff, I'm sure you can do it, but I gotta ask: why don't you just buy a model without remote? Only 5 or 6 of about a zillion models come with the remote built in.
And FWIW, I love the remote. It lets you have the fan on high when you go to bed and want the fan on high because, well, use your imagination here, and then turn it down later when the room cools down without getting out of bed.
HTH,
Paul
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On Sun, 23 May 2004 19:53:57 -0400, Paul Franklin

When the ROOM cools down? Ha. Hahahahaha. Nice try at fooling us; we know what's really heating up and cooling down.
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