Buying Steel Beam

The 90 year-old wooden door frame to my cellar had been damaged by termites over the years. I finally got around to removing the frame and would like to replace it with steel. The old frame was not load bearing, but I would like to use steel in case the rough masonry walls surrounding the door sag in the future. Where does one typically buy steel beam? I don't recall seeing it at the local hardware stores, though I plan to double-check tomorrow.
FYI, I'll be needing one 5' beam with the cross section of an (old) 2x4 and one 8' column with the cross section of an (old) 4x4. The beam will need to lay flat (the "I" sideways), which I believe is not the best configuration for an I-beam. Maybe a hollow steel beam would be a better choice?
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@frontiernet.net wrote:

talking about. Got any before and now pictures you can post someplace? Having trouble picturing how 5 foot and 8 foot pieces would be involved in a door frame, unless this is an oversize door. The column description scares me- hope you have a temporary in place to hold up whatever is over the former location of that.
As a complete WAG, I'd say go to a real door wholesaler, and see what a custom-sized commercial-grade steel door and frame would cost. I see odd sizes of those all the time, for retrofits in the basements of old buildings. You put anchors in the surrounding masonry, linked to the frame, and then fill the voids with mortar or concrete.
Personally, if it all is truly non-load-bearing, I'd just build back with treated wood, and take measures to keep the area dry, and provide an air gap between dirt and wood. (such as regrading on the outside of door, or adding flashing or something.) The first one lasted 90 years- how much longer is the rest of the house going to last? Unless flooding/frost heave/ice in cracks is a problem, a 90 YO masonry wall has probably sagged all it is ever going to sag.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perhaps what you need is a lentil, which is basically a steel angle line that goes above door openings and windows. The best place to get steel material is a local iron works shop. They will cut the material you need. It should not be much,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, lentils make good soup, but lousy support. Lintels work better
Look in the Yellow Pages for "Steel Distributors" They will have what you want. If you don't need certifications they may even have some used stuff. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Lou
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Doesn't that depend on the way you cook them, Ed?
Steve ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Please see ongoing thread about DIYers who cause themselves more work than they save.
And go to Mexico and observe the architecture and building methods there. It sounds like something you are considering.
If you can't find an I beam, or know which way it goes, you should not be allowed to handle a hammer without adult supervision.
Troll on. Or we will read about you in the newspapers.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 18, 11:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@frontiernet.net wrote:

Use treated wood steel is not worth the trouble or expense, what would make you think it will be stronger or better
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

call many different steel suppliers, some dont want to be bothered by homeowners and charge far more than the item is worth
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 07:45:27 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

With the market slowdown these guys do seem to be a little more patient with a beginner but the more you know about the product the easier it will go. Have a very good idea of what size beam you need. They are generally sized by the height and weight per foot (IE a common beam size is 8" x 17). You can always go heavier but the height is usually going to be limited by the hole you are putting it in. I know the guys in a steel yard around here that normally kicks homeowners out fairly rudely were very happy to take my money and work with me but I did have a pretty good idea of what to ask for. They do seem happier with a check or cash than trying to use a credit card. Some don't even take them but a surprising number do. I usually take cash and enough small bills to get exact change.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Chuckle. Yeah, I have bought used steel that way before, too. Other than estimated weights for each pile, there is no inventory trail for scrap steel, and if it sold for cash, well, what business is it of mine if it gets logged in on that day's receipts?
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@frontiernet.net wrote:

How do you plan on doing something w/ this much structural steel?
I'll reiterate the others' comments -- either use a metal exterior door in the opening or simply rebuild w/ pressure treated lumber. Either will certainly be likely to outlast your need for them.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.