Buying a new (well water bladder) pressure tank

I measured only 12psi of air in my bladder tank after it was fully emptied of water. Should be around 28. Need to buy a new pressure tank (32gal equivalent or bigger) and am looking for recommendations. I've read some poor reviews of HomeDepot's Flotec tank. Local plumbing supply scowled when I mentioned Amtrol because they use "lower grade steel made in China" but I'm not sure how valid that claim is because he was trying REALLY hard to sell me his floor model. I've also seen Utilitech tanks from Lowes that appear to be a good buy.
Is there a quality heirarchy out there for these tanks? All recommendations appreciated.
Thanks, Theodore
P.S. thanks for all the great replies to my previous post to investigate my tank/pump problem!
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One issue is whether you want steel or composite. The steel ones I've seen look nicer, with a nice bright painted finish, while the composite ones have a rougher look to them. If it's going someplace where it can be seen, like beside the house, that may be an issue, as is how the finish lasts when exposed to weather. The advantage to composite is that they cost less and won't rust, so in 10 years, they may look better than the steel one when used outside.
Have you verified that the tank bladder is not holding air and it's not the air valve that is leaking, etc?
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Tank location is in basement corner, so no need to be beautiful. There's enough corrosion on the tank tee to indicate the whole assembly's getting on in years. Certainly older than the 6years I've owned this place. I've not verified if or where the leak is. Honestly, I'm worried that if I attempt to recharge the air, some immediate failure will occur and I'll be without water until I _run_ and get a new tank now. (Is this a legitimate concern?) So just dealing with the somewhat more frequent pumping (pump engages every 2 gallons used, on average) until I replace.
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millinghill wrote:

I'd not worry, no.
Recharge it will be better for the system than continuing to cycle the pump.
I'd recommend looking at diaphragm type as well...can't recall what the brand here is--they're blue, though :) I'll try to recall to go to the well house and look while I'm out...
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I agree. The only risk I see is if the valve stem is corroded/shot so bad that it starts leaking water. And it would only leak water if the bladder was ruptured. If you have 12 PSI with the tank drained, that should not be an issue. The only other bad thing that could happen, I guess, if the air valve is fouled up and you try to put air in it, and it leaks all the air out, you could wind up with no air at all. But then you should be able to just replace the air valve, again unless the whole thing is shot.


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Buying a new (well water bladder) pressure tank:

Indeed, go ahead and recharge. What's more important IMO than the brand of tank is plumbing it to allow easy replacement the next time you have to replace it. IMO, just get whatever tank they have locally.
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dpb wrote: ...

Gould Pumps Hydro Pro, it be...as someone else said, I'd not be overly concerned; a tank is basically a tank.
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A pressurized device leaks air. And you find that surprising? So, hook up your air compressor, and inflate to 28 PSI. I wouldn't replace the tank unless it's a fast leak.
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You guys totally rock!! Just emptied all water from tank, pumped air pressure to 26PSI (2 below the cut-in pressure of the pump) and turned it all back on. Now I get 8+ gallons before the pump comes on instead of only 2!! Even the missus says we've always had the pump kick on after each flush, so maybe it's been 12psi since we bought the house 4+years ago. So, I'll keep an eye on the air pressure from time-to-time to see if/how it lowers. If it doesn't go down any time quick, I'll conclude that the tank is fine. Again, thanks to all of you!!
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Never having had a well, I'm only thinking out loud. Can you turn off the well (switch or breaker). Then open a faucet. Inflate the tank to 28 PSI. Screw a cap on the inflater valve stem. Turn the faucet off, and power on. Would that do the job?
I agree, there are some rather wise and helpful and kind people who post to this list.
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On Thursday, October 14, 2010 8:43:55 AM UTC-5, millinghill wrote:

My tank leaks air pressure and when I add back air pressure then air squirts out of the faucets. Is the bladder shot?
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On Thursday, October 14, 2010, someone with little to no posting history to this newsgroup going by the name "millinghill" wrote:

Today, a usenet baby and google-groper, going by the name ralfehr @ gmail.com, located either in Arkansas (possibly little rock) or Abiquiu NM, replied Millinghill's 3-year-old post by saying:

Congratulations Ralf Ehr!
You win the alt.home.repair Bone Head post-of-the-day award!
Bend your leaky, squirty bladder over and take your prize!
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On Sat, 5 Apr 2014 09:14:29 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Maybe. Maybe not.
How old is your tank? The older tanks, mine is 40 years old, have no bladder. The phenomenon you are seeing is what happens when you pass the threshold of the cut in pressure when charging the tank. That's no big deal.
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replying to millinghill, Teverk wrote:

I am at the same point as you, I am in need of a new pressure tank, I researched the reviews on Lowes website it seems the majority of the reviews for all the Utilitech tanks are not that great, many are failing within 5 years or not working right out of the box....
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2014 19:44:02 +0000, Teverk

I would just shoot some air in there and keep an eye on it. Losing the charge is pretty normal. That is why they put an air valve on it. When you air them up and the air comes out of the water line, you know you are in trouble. I have seen the bladders for sale on the internet but they are almost as much as a new tank.
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On Thursday, October 14, 2010 at 9:43:55 AM UTC-4, millinghill wrote:

Geezz,I'd like to know how to get the water out to change the tank. I see all manner of plugs but no drain,duh. WTF was the plumber thinking? There is a pin hole leak on the side of my big blue tank, another duh?
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 07:43:25 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it was installed properly, there would be valve in the pipes, near where it enters the bottom of the tank. There should also be a union in the pipes. I have installed many of these tanks. I always have a union to make it easy to install, and disconnect, and I always have a tee, on the bottom of the pipes, where one side goes to the bottom of the tank, and the other side of the tee is a valve (faucet spigot). That spigot not only allows for draining the tank, but comes in handy for connecting a garden hose, for example, if you want to wash the basement floor. And in a place where the plumbing might freeze, that valve allows an easy way to drain the plumbing system.
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On Thursday, October 14, 2010 at 9:43:55 AM UTC-4, millinghill wrote:

My tank is only 15 years old with a pin hole now;big blue one. Are there stainless tanks???
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On Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 10:49:30 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Even if they are avaiable, I don't think you or many other folks would like the price. They do have fiberglass/composite types in smaller sizes, up to ~25 gallons at least. Aren't the steel ones lined with plastic anyway?
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