Buryng Well Head ?

I have a drilled well thats 845' deep. It's a 12-year old house. We bought it 4 years ago when it was 8 years old. For some reason, the previous owner/builder drilled the well right on the edge of the driveway along the edge of the woods. This has caused problems for us, especially in the winter when we have our driveway plowed out. The well head sits so low that even in the summer someone sitting in a high pickup might not see it and could clip it and crack or break it. I have to mark it with a 6-foot high fluorescent orange pole so no one runs into it.
I'm currently building a detached garage, and I was very limited in the placement of the garage because of the way the house is configured, the way it sits on the 20-acre lot, where the adjacent property owners property line is, and because of our town's setback requirements. Consequently, I had to expand the driveway into the wood line a little bit, and now the well head is sticking out of the driveway, about 10 feet from the edge making it even more of a target to run into with a vehicle !
I'd like to dig out around the well head down about 2 feet, cut it off, recap it, and then bury it, or put some sort of heavy duty steel or aluminum box over it with a hinged lid flush with the gravel driveway surface so we can drive and snow plow right over it, but also just have to lift the lid up if we ever need to get at the well for any reason.
Now - are there things I should know or consider before doing this ?
Thanks !
Shawn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

house. We bought

the previous

driveway along the

especially in the

head sits so low that

not see it and

with a 6-foot high

limited in the

configured, the way

owners property line

Consequently, I had to

now the well head

edge making it even

feet, cut it off,

steel or aluminum

driveway surface so we

to lift the lid up

doing this ?

Straight forward, a bit of work too: Just be sure to check your local ordnances/zoning regs. Ours is in a 6 x 6 cement box - loads of room to work down in there, no freezing, etc..
Pop
Pop
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Only down side of burying it is your making a way for runoff and contaminants to enter your well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So be sure the enclosure floor (if there is one) pitched *away* from the well casing and have the casing slightly elevated from the floor. Maybe use a gravel floor in the box/pit instead?

contaminants
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

for runoff and

Yes, definitely! Ours has a pipe that runs into our basement to the sump; the electric & water supply comes in inside a 6 inch pipe. You do NOT want to allow water to collect inside an enclosure like that or you can easily contaminate the well water, or ... worse. The pipe also allows a small amount of heat to keep things in there from freezing. Glad someone thought to mention this!
Pop
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Randd01) wrote in message

Yep, whatever you use to bury it will have to be waterproof, not just now but for years in the future.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

doing,
mean
No point in reinventing the wheel, when you can buy it off the shelf. Check your local precast concrete company. They probably have precast concrete or HDPE well/valve pits that will be appropriate. If they go 'huh?', ask local utilities and street departments where they get theirs. Plain steel or even aluminum will have corrosion problems. If you want the lid to be drivable, you are will need a cast iron top ring and lid (or at least a metal lip and thick diamond plate) like what you see out in a street manhole service pit. If possible freezing is a problem, make an inner foam lid that fits under real lid. If you can put the foam deep enough (ie below frostline), ground heat may be enough, otherwise you may need to add heat somehow. Remember, unless the pump is within arm's length of surface, you have to be able to get down there <with> it to work on it. Plumbers hate hanging upside down.
Oh, yeah, some people will probably holler at you for posting a binary, rather than a link to the website you probably don't have. You may want to check with your ISP- many offer 'toy' websites for free as part of your account. (useless for anything but posting pictures of the kids, etc, but handy for stuff like this.)
aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

bought
that
way
line
to
even
aluminum
up
In many cases the well head does not have to be at the top of the well. In-laws have a 400+ ft well and the head iis over 60ft away from the well inside of his workshop. All you may need to do is cut the pipe below grade install an elbo and pipe and locate the head elsewhere. Your particular installation may prevent this of course.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I never thought of that. I think I'm going to call a well company to ask what they think, but I hadn't thought of an elbow. That should work in our case. thank !

the
high
head
we
lid
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shawn wrote:

Unless they have to pull out the well pump for repair or replacement (2 times in 20 years for me), then they have to undo the elbow joint to have a straight run to the pump. When you call the well company, ask them about burying the well head instead. I am sure they have done plenty of them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.