Burying black iron pipe

Page 2 of 3  


They are very helpful when you ask them BEFORE you do something.
Like any person, they get really cranky when you try to make their lives difficult by cutting corners or doing a job wrong.
TMT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here's what happened to an unwrapped galvanized coupling after 3 years of burial in central California......Paul
http://0304.netclime.net/1_5/000/000/522/a91/pipe.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This brings to mind something I was thinging about to extend the life of the pipe I buried. Would it be advantagous to attach a large buried zinc anode to the gas pipe to delay corrosion when the coatings finally do break down? The wire from the anode could be attached to an above ground portion of the pipe.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

check with local codes, I would run the direct burial plastic service line pipe. thats all thats used locally for main service
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And, from watching the gas company do it a couple weeks ago, requires very expensive tooling and careful technique to make joints.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That was actually described in the old "blue book" the local utility published with gas regulations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now that's what I wanted to hear. I already have the anode, from a second hand marine supply place for $7. About 7"x 2" x3/4" of zinc with a wire coming out of the block. I guess I'll go ahead with that project.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That should work.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a gas fitter or at least someone licensed to do it or you could blow up yours and your nieghbors house. As most of the places ban the use of Galvanized pipe with gas type k cooper tube is all we use here and have started to use plastic buriul pipe . WHAT EVER you do don,t use poly as the gas will break it down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why on earth should attaching an anode to the outside of a gas pipe require a "gas fitter"? And what does that have to do with galvanized pipe, other than being a substitute for the protection provided?
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you use plastic, you have to use a special high density poly that is listed for gas. Suppliers here sell it to licensed plumbers. We have galvanized pipe all over the place for natural gas, particularly on runs across flat roofs. Underground runs that are not done with poly are done with the plastic covered black pipe as mentioned by other posters. The local utility should have a book or pdf available online with regulations for gas piping.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I saw a similar thing happen here in NJ at a condo complex with 120 units. The underground pipe that went from the meter to the individual condo unit was black pipe. We started to see failures within a few years of original installation by the builder. The root cause of the problem was obvious. Upon digging them out, you could see a tar coating had been applied to the top and sides of the pipe, but not the bottom. It had obviously been either brushed or poured on after the pipe was in the trench and they did not do the bottom. The top and sides were OK. The bottom looked like swiss cheese. I would never have believed any iron pipe would fail that quickly. But it did and we had to replace all of them. And just about all of them had either very significant corrosion, or were totally shot and actually leaking gas.
The advice from the local gas company at the time was that black pipe with wrapping was the recommended replacement. Today I would use the new flex gas lines.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The correct pipe for what you are doing is yellow poly pipe. The joints and fittings are melted together. There are stab connections made for this stuff if your AHJ will accept. You may have to hire a plumber to make the terminations. http://www.wngp.com/gaslines.html
CSST is for running on the interior. I do not know if it rated for or accepted as direct bury.
Copper piping is acceptable in most jurisdictions with all joints above ground if possible.
The other choice would be to buy the black pipe with a green plastic coating bonded to it. All nicks, scuffs, dings, and fittings will need special treatment and wrapping with the appropriate coal tar or vinyl tape.
While looking for information to help you, I found this article: <http://www.co.st-louis.mo.us/pubworks/PermGasGrills.pdf Make sure to read detail number 8.
--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ignoramus11107 wrote:

It might, but who cares?
The pipe will outlast your grill no matter what you do to the pipe.
And why three feet? Six inches seems about right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wrong
and wrong.

steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker LT wrote:

How so? A buried black-iron pipe will last 30 years - an outside grill will be luck to last 30 months. We ran an iron pipe, under salt water, to a gas light at the end of a pier. That was over twenty years ago. The lamp is still on. Of course the pipe is covered with barnacles, so that might protect it some. Still...

How so? Burying the pipe is purely cosmetic - you could run it over the grass and it wouldn't matter.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What matters is doing it to code. Below are a couple of examples.
http://www.sunnyvale.ca.gov/NR/rdonlyres/5B4EDFE3-4160-4465-9CD7-DE2188DBDB58/0/GasPiping.pdf Underground installation: factory-coated material listed for underground gas line
installation and installed in accordance with the manufacturers requirements.
Fittings may be wrapped in the field with an approved material. When using nonmetallic
pipe, an 18 AWG yellow continuous wire must be attached to the exterior of
the pipe.
http://www.stlawrencegas.com/home/Underground%20piping%20requirements.pdf
5. Dig a trench approximately 18 deep x 6 wide - The dimension of the trench can be
reduced to 12x 6 if external damage to pipe is not likely to result. If a 12 cover
cannot be maintained, the pipe shall be installed in conduit.
6. Run gas pipe and tracer wire - Your contractor is responsible for installing the gas
piping and tracer wire. The piping must be polyethylene and sized properly for the
input of the pool heater.
Even the Brits want 15" of cover
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pipelines/faqs.htm
A gas service pipe should normally be laid with a minimum depth of cover of 375 mm in private ground and 450 mm in footpaths and highways.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Oh. No good reason, though. Okay.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had to do it by tomorrow. We are redoing concrete and concrete people will concrete the area tomorrow. I ended up using iron pipes. (which I had to cut and thread in several points).
I coated the iron pipes with a very generous coat of military surplus cosmoline, then wrapped then in closed cell pipe foam insulation, and buried them in river pea gravel. I am on a little hill, so the water table is not even close to the pipe.
I think that they will hold up for quite a while.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If the gas pipe is coming up through the new concrete, wrap a layer of foam rubber or some such to keep the pipe from being locked in the slab.
--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.