bury conduit

I just dug a trench to bury some coax cable...thinking of putting it into 2" pvc conduit (in it will be 4 runs of cable...directv).
I'd also like to run electric to a garage at the end of the trench (about 50'), can i run romex in the pvc with the coax? any other tips or suggestions?
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No. Install 2 conduits in same trench. Don Young

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You can get direct burial coax cable and direct burial UF cable for the electric

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You really don't want to run power and coax in the same conduit. I just ran a 250 foot run in my church between 2 building to extend internet and telephone from one building to another. Rather than using pvc conduit and glue joints every 10 feet, we used a 300' coil of 1" ID "irrigation pipe." This was all one piece. It was burried using a trenching tool .... I didn't see it done. I had to do a little custom grinding to fit standard plastic boxes at the ends, but the whole thing worked real well. We pulled 6 cat5e cables for internet and our Partner telephone system. Each rectangular box at the ends has 6 RJ-45 connectors us use as needed. We're only using 3 right now, but we have 3 extras for growth.
Billy Thompson wrote:

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I may go with direct burial electric cable and then check out your idea for the coax and irrigation pipe...luckily my home wireless network covers my garage!
thanks.
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If I were putting in coax on my property, I would just bury it. I'd bury the electrical cable the required 18" deep (I think that's the NEC) and put the coax cables above it a few inches under the surface. The cable company only goes down a few inches from the house to the pedestal. I did the 'conduit' thing at the church because the telephone system is a proprietary signal over cat5 and internet over wireless would be a security risk as some of the computers in the office have private data on them. I realize wireless can be secure, however, with enough desire, 'locks' can be 'picked.'
Billy Thompson wrote:

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Billy Thompson wrote:

Use seperate conduit for high voltage and low voltage. PVC conduit carrying high voltage should be buried to 18 inches as per NEC. Definitely use conduit if doing this job for yourself. You can always run additional cable later on in the same conduit if necessary.
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I buried some 12v (but low current) coax for elements of a MW phased array
http://home.att.net/~rhhardin/antenna.jpg shows two elements
with a step-on lawn edger when the lawn was wet, just below the grass, the idea being just to keep it clear of the lawnmower and use the dirt to attenuate common-mode RFI on its way to the antenna.
It also makes the coax easy to find (tune an AM radio to a weak station and turn the radio so the station is just audible; when you drag the radio across the coax, the signal level jumps up. Works every time.) and repair (know the distances any connectors beforehand) since you only have to scratch up a tiny bit of coax.
I don't know that conduit helps, in the sense that it will retain water as well as shield from it. The dirt just below the grass is usually dryish, which may be a better common state.
I've lost one of 8 cables to lightning in 8 years (so 64 cable-years) but otherwise they work nicely. The lightning one wasn't a direct hit but just a difference in ground voltage between the two ends of a long run.
But you already have the trench, so the lawn edger suggestion has little value, I guess.
--
Ron Hardin
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com
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Keep the runs separate. And a bare minimum of 1' between the "power" lines and the coax. Induction currents can happen in "dirt".
Using some type of metallic conduit for at least one of the runs will help too or even just wrapping them in some tinfoil before you cover them
AMUN
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wrote:

Bullshit. The only reason utilities have separation is so they don't dig up each other's stuff.
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induction from close proximity power can induce quite a bit of voltage with a long run of cable.
300 feet of over head power lines, telephone cable about 3 feet below and unterminated on each end. Went to terminate one end after cable was hung, once a got hold of the wire and touched the metal can that was grounded knowcked me on my ass.

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That's why they twist communication cable. Common mode noise is rejected anyway.
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Yes twisting the the wires can reduce noise, Not the same for inductive power
wrote:

with
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Amun posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

Once again ABUM you prove you are an asshole!!
--
My boss said I was dumb and apathetic.
I said I don\'t know and I don\'t care...
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