Burnt electrical outlet and plug

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We recently had one burnt electrical outlet at our office. The appliance plug is also burnt as well. All the outlets at our office is rated at 20Amps and have fuse protection. The fuse did not trip. Anyone has a clue why the outlet and the plug are burnt? I am planning to just replace the burnt outlets and the appliance plug, but I really prefer to know what caused the burning in the first place.
Here are 2 photos showing the plug and the outlet:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54230006@N07/5341105173 / http://www.flickr.com/photos/54230006@N07/5341718398 /
Thanks
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What types of devices to those plugs belong to? Not the outlets. The plugs.
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wrote:

It is connected to a power conditioner which powers some audio devices. The input to the power conditioner shows it is rated up to 30Amps but we actually do not have that many devices being powered by this conditioner. So I doubt it is drawing the full 30Amps. Also the 20Amp building fuse would have tripped if the power drain was higher than 20Amps.
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On 1/9/2011 10:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

What kind of power conditioner? Big sucker with a (constant voltage) transformer in it? Note the posts about reactive loads (more apt to arc I believe). All that means for you is a better plug and socket, with the original fault lying in the plug. And perhaps do away with the conditioner if it is a constant voltage type and your voltage is tolerable.
Jeff
The input to the power conditioner shows it is rated up to

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Your outlets are 15 amp, not 20. The correct outlet will have a T- shape plug hole on the hot side. If the breaker is 20 amp and the wiring is 12 ga, somebody really screwed up.
Joe
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Why do you believe that he needs 20A outlets? The appliance obviously has a 15A plug on it, so it's not intended for more than 15A.
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On 1/10/2011 1:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

It looks like an after market plug. We know little about the power conditioner except that it is rated at 30A. Possibly something like an RV plug was on it at one time (and what would you plug that in to!). But I'm just speculating...
Jeff
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In

I'd further speculate that it's probably just a case of pulling the plug while something with a large xfmr was drawing high current. Or, since this looks like a non-professional job, a wire internal to either plug or socket was touching gnd or neutral and it burnt away the short for them. Either way, it's not to code, is an OSHA violation and IMO wasn't installed by anyone knowing the fire or electrical codes.
HTH,
Twayne`
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Then why would a 20A plug be any better?
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On 1/10/2011 5:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I never mentioned 20, it's a 15A plug on it, and I'm just speculating that someone put a 15A plug on because they didn't have a 30A socket for the 30A plug. I don't know, the OP will have to clear this up, or not...
Jeff
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You were answering a thread discussing changing from a 15A outlet to a 20A outlet. If it's supposed to be a 30, a 20 isn't going to help. It won't help anyway. That's not the problem.
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On 1/10/2011 10:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I read this as the OP thought he had a 20A but it is only 15. I didn't see anything in this thread that mentioned changing to a 20A plug, or socket. You are reading something I don't see.
If it's supposed to be a 30, a 20 isn't going to help. It won't help

I agree. It's likely a plug problem and it is unknown what complications there are.
At any rate, the OP is gone, and the threads are wandering into abstract oblivion. So, what else is new?
Jeff
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Did you actually read the post I replied to? It's still up there (look for the '^' string, above).

Not much.
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On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 12:49:32 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

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On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 12:49:32 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

the pictures before.
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On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 16:16:45 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Right, it's a 15A outlet and a 15A plug. No foul there.
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Without having a beter look , I would say that in the plug where the wire is connected to the prong, there is a loose or high resistance connection.
You usually get heat build up at the bad connections. If the plug can be taken apart, see if the connection is loose. Unless there is some reason the whole prong is not making connection all over the plug and socket, there probably was nothing wrong with the socket except the plug overheated and caused the burnt spots on the socket.
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It looks as if someone plugged it into a different socket, proving that the low resistance (bad connection) is in the plug. When taking apart the plug observe the terminal condition. As mentioned previously the wire to spade connection was probably compromised. Cut off at least 4 inches to find bright copper, install a NEW plug maybe soldering, or crimping on a spade, tighten securely, and plug it into one of the unburnt sockets. Feel the appliance wire for abnormal temperature. Observe any and all safety procedures.
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I see this all the time at my job / business.
Bad plug melts and burns damaging both receptable and plug, high resistance heating.
Replace both plug and receptable check for heated wires at receptable too. cut wire back from plug overheated plug wire will not connect well and lead to futher overheating. coppewr tends to look dark.
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Observe any and all safety procedures. Note which http://www.flickr.com/photos/54230006@N07/5341718398 / WOAH missed that completely!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Domestic_AC_Type_B_USA.jpg
What is current doing on the NEUTRAL wire! Get one of these http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?VISuperSize&item 0515927237 and see if house wiring is correct. If O.K there is a ground / neutral disconnect in the device
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