Burning particle board

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"mike" wrote

I was kinda wondering about the driftwood....
I can't see a reason to not use it unless it's on the edge of a chemical dump or something.
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I did a bit of googling, and saw:
http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/air/particulates/rwssabi.html
The more significant rationale seems to be that driftwood on ocean beaches is laden with salt. Entirely aside from the mentioned potential of dioxin/furan production, chlorine ions and heat will accelerate the corrosion of metal stove or venting systems, and aren't terribly good to be downwind of either.
But they're unlikely to get too terribly bent out of shape if it's an emergency to avoid freezing to death.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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"Chris Lewis" wrote

Snicker, ok. I'd not burn it inside but it seems strange that something i can drop in my fishtank (goldies) would harm me if burned.
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I'll bet that you don't put driftwood fresh off a saltwater beach in with the goldfish...
Presuming by "goldie" you mean goldfish. I don't know how tolerant of salt goldfish are. Some tropical fish aren't tolerant of salt at all.
I'd hope you wouldn't throw it in without at least rinsing it first. How many people rinse their firewood? ;-)
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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"Chris Lewis" wrote

No, I soak it for 3-5 days in 2-3 changes of water.

Godifish are very tolerant of salt water.

Dunno but i doubt it's a prob,em when having a clamfest on the beach.
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I have often wonderd about it myself. Of course there are the various salts that were absorbed while it was immersed but would there be enough to cause a problem? Corrosion problem in the chimney stack?
Harry K
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"Harry K" wrote

Chris mentins corrrosive salts in the air which could be a problem with metal works. Obviously not a problem with outdoor burning.
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Now, Bob. What does the EPA know compared to Frank?
Steve ;-)
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"Frank" wrote

I think the issue is he doesnt know if it was treated for exterior uses or not. Case of 'if in doubt, throw it out'.
I found it intriguing that another uses such in his furnace. I imagine all vapors vent outside so this might be sorta 'ok'?
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I don't need to "address" the fucking issue. I just asked what people thought and said that I thought it wasn't a very good idea. I asked for input. One does that when seeking knowledge.
That is, unless the person already knows everything.
Not pointing anyone out in particular, mind you.
Steve
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Ive burned it in my wood furnace and outdoors in my burn barrel. Of course I dont make a point of standing in the smoke like I would a campfire.
On Wed, 07 Nov 2007 19:12:32 -0500, Frank

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"SteveB" wrote

I've never done it as I've always heard that. I presume the fumes or something?

Yes, as long as you arent dealing with a chimney flue and cresote then it's ok. Sparks alot though.

If I didnt know what was in it, I'd be hesitant.
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CCA lumber, when burned, generates various arsenic compounds in the air. Including Arsine which is hideously toxic.




The glues will outgas various things, many of them not altogether good for you. Amounts will vary depending on fire temperature etc.
Should not be burned.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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Burning the pine is OK, just don't cook over it as the food won't taste very good
Do NOT burn the particleboard though.. It has potential nasty stuff in it.
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It's obvious that you've already made up your mind about which answers are acceptable to you. Why'd you bother asking in the first place?
It burns readily. No, smoke is not good to breathe (duh). The level of pollution it makes may or may not be acceptable to you. Are we done?
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wrote:

Yeah. We're done.
Was it good for you?
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

Thanks, Steve, your responses to me and others proves my opinion of you is correct.
Frank
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wrote:

Frank, you have NO idea how that makes me feel.
Steve
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Seems you (individual) have a poor opinion of him. Odd that the unanimous opinion of everyone in this thread agree about you.
Harry K
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