Burning particle board

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I think I know the answer, but I'll ask anyway.
We have lumber scraps left over from construction. Some are pine odd lengths, some treated pine, and a bunch of particle board.
I know NOT to burn treated lumber.
I THINK that untreated regular pine will burn fine in our backyard fire pit.
What about particle board? I know it has glues in it, and think it probably should go to the landfill, but thought I'd ask youse guys.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

It's not allowed to be burned in WA State. Check with your local air quality folks.
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Dave
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SteveB writes:

Exterior grade products are typically glued with phenol-formaldehyde resins, meaning that combustion products involve some really nasty chemicals.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Probably no worse chemicals than the wood itself. I'd burn it.
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Frank wrote:

Breath deep when you do burn some Frank, enjoy the outdoor fire.
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Yeah, Frank. As we said in the sixties, "Take a BIG hit!"
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

particle board.
Frank
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Your attitude is obvious, Frank.
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Yes, I asked, and I think you were incapable of giving a short answer that covered the simple questions asked. I think you had to delve into your overeducated brain and begin a dissertation on the subject.
Next time, just keep it simple and answer the questions.
BTW, would contact caused by a running leap be equal to inhaling the vapors of the burning particle board? Just wondering, so I thought I'd ask Mr. Know It All.
Steve
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Two words I hate: probably and should.
Steve
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Here's a guy without a clue.
Bob
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Bob F wrote:

phenol resins, there is no harm in burning and combustion products are no worse than burning pure wood. If it contains preservatives such as arsenicals or chlorinated compounds or flame retardants of a similar nature, it is best land filled.
OP and some respondents are not addressing issue.
Frank
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So you see no problem with the _amount_ of binder? There isn't much in natural wood, there is a whole lot in chipboard or any other "manufactured" sheet goods.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

I don't think that's at all what Frank said or intended -- the point is what the chemistry is and what are the _actual_ combustion byproducts produced rather than simply knee-jerk reaction of "bad".
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dpb wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lignin and compare to phenolic resin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenol_formaldehyde_resin You see a lot of similarity. Both when completely burned give carbon dioxide and water. That's why I say the composite should be as safe to burn as wood.
Frank
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"Completely burned" is the key here. In an open fire, will phenol formaldehyde resin _completely_ burn, or will significant quantities of outgas "escape" without burning. Certainly, in a contained/controlled high temperature furnace, it'll only emit CO2 and water. But an open fire is _very_ different.
Most locally available softwoods (especially pine) are essentially entirely non-toxic. You can eat it - you can't digest it, but it won't poison you. Phenols and formaldehyde are toxic. Phenols are also known to have relatively high decomposition temperatures. Takes quite a bit to get bakelite to "properly" burn, and in open air the burn isn't even remotely "clean".
You don't want to be near burning bakelite (particle board is essentially wood fibers in a bakelite matrix by implication of that link). I've encountered overheated/scorched/burned bakelite in electrical equipment. It ain't just CO2 and water by a long shot.
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Chris Lewis,

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Assuming (and you are incorrect, it does give off other vapors) it only gives off water vapor and CO2 you must not care about the green house effect. Both affect it.
Burning wood _in the long run_ (pay attention to that) is carbon/water vapor neutral. If not burned it puts out the same amount when it decays. So what is different about particle board? The great excess amount of the binders which is not carbon neutral.
Harry K
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I could be wrong, but the EPA seems to agree with me. "Never burn ocean driftwood, plywood, particle board, or any wood with glue on or in it. They all release toxic chemicals when burned."
http://www.epa.gov/woodstoves/healthier.html
Bob
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Snort. NEVER burn DRIFTWOOD or ANY wood with glue ON it? Oh brother. It sure makes the EPA sound like alarmist ninnies.
If I'm ever coming down with hypotheria, I'll be sure not to burn driftwood because the EPA says so. Never means never. :)
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If you want to take it to rediculous extremes which is not the intent of EPA. In emergencies, almost anything goes and they won't object.
Harry K
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