Bummed out about insulation cost

Page 2 of 2  
I WAS talking about "properly fitted fiberglass". I got a quote of $1,050 to put recycled denim insulation in the attic rafters. When I asked him to quote me for the same job using fiberglass, he said it was so much less efficient that they (their company) didn't use it. . .
So you're saying that Denim *is* more efficient, but "not much more"? So would you recommend getting a quote from another company--one that does use fiberglass?
Lesley
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lesley wrote:

I don't know anything about denim as an insulating material--never seen it used so have no data. I'd think it would be possible to Google for detailed specs on it and any other materials and get real data, not just speculation.
I would also get at <least> one other quote just on general principles....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It might be that denim is slightly more efficient than fiberglass. Cellulose is. But both denim and loose blown cellulose have more drastic drawbacks (packdown or soakdown or both).
If you're that concerned, look for someone who can do Rockwool and get a quote.
Rockwool is only a trifle more expensive than fiberglass, is a bit more efficient than fiberglass, and is better than fiberglass in most of the other issues with fiberglass.
Better sound control too.
See www.roxul.com for one brand.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Denim batts, or blown-in denim?
Denim batts and fiberglass batts have about equal R-values. Cotton blown-in and cellulose blown-in have about equal R-values.
The real work in insulating an attic is putting in the styrofoam, cardboard, or plastic eave vent chutes. If you have no soffit vents (or no soffits), the installer may still have to block off the point where the rafters intersect the top plate to keep blown- in insulation from escaping there. Usually they'll stuff under the chutes or at that point with fiberglass batting. It's not a pleasant job. You lay on your back or stomach on a board in a very tight space.
Once that work is done, laying batts or blowing in the insulation is a piece of cake.
I'm presuming that you already have insulation in the attic. Have you considered just rolling out unfaced fiberglass batts on top of it?
--
Doug Boulter

To reply by e-mail, remove the obvious word from the e-mail address
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some of what you're mulling over involves which material to use, while other questions involve marginal differences. However, adding a second "method" in addition to internal insulation can make the benefits add up to more than the sum of its parts. Not really in terms of insulation factors, since that would defy the laws of physics, but in terms of comfort and peace of mind. So....have you considered new siding, and adding Tyvek underneath it? That's the silver stuff you see houses covered with before the siding goes on. Do that, along with whatever insulation you choose, and you're gonna have one snug house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.