built-in subzero fridge

The house we recently purchased has a built-in subzero refrigerator, which is approximately 20 years old. Within 1-2 mos of our moving in it stopped keeping food at the optimal level. We called a 'subzero repair person' and $300+ later it was working again. Literally the day after it was repaired it stopped making ice, and the freezer developed warm pockets - areas where the food remains at room temperature. I do not want to spend another $300 to fix it and I certainly do not want to waste my money on another subzero. I know the fridge that I want to purchase, but it is not a built-in. The question is - will I need a subzero person to come over and remove the fridge, OR can the new person coming in to deliver/install the fridge do the job? Any insight will help - thanks.
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techie, but I did have a sub-zero and did install it with the help of a cabinet installer buddy. My experience is with a much more current model, tho, maybe 10 years ago.
Things kinda depend on whether the existing SZ is flush mounted into a wall cavity. Rarely done 20 years ago, but possible. A built-in unit will likely have a mount kit that fastens from the top of the fridge to a brace on the wall, to prevent movement and especially tipping. If you have cupboards or such very close to the top of the fridge, it might be tough to get to. We placed ours, hooked up everything and tested it, then "built it in" using end panels and upper level cabinets overtop.
This is what I had to do to move it (if I recall correctly). Don't know if this info is model specific: I had just enough room to get a rachet in to remove the bolt from the fridge top (under the overhead cabinet). Then you need to use a screwdriver to turn the screw heads on the bottom of the fridge under the exhaust panel. This drops the wheels at the four corners. You should be able to roll it out enough to get it disconnected from power at that point, then roll it completely out.
Disposal is another matter - those beasties are heavy! And take some careful measurements to ensure a replacement will fit if you intend to try to re-use the build-in panels or cabinetry.
FWIW, we sold ours with our previous house and not a day goes by that I don't miss it. The dual compressors and seals on that thing kept our food fresh way longer than the a "standard" fridge. We now own a respectable Jenn-Air model, but it is like a toy in comparison. Like most everything else, ya gets what ya pays for.
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First, I'd call the repair guy back. Next day is a bit fast for a breakdown.
Second, any refrigeration company should be able to remove the old one.
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Christopher A. Young
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