Built-in house vacuum.

Some years ago they were a big item here but have noticed that most people stop using them in favour of something smaller/lighter compared to the bulky/heavy hoses and the messy business of emptying them inside the house.
Often wondered if/why the central canister units for such systems could be installed so they are emptied from outside the house. To avoids recirculating the dust inside house. Or perhaps the canister could be mounted in the garden shed outside?
Suggestions welcomeed.
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terry wrote:

They usually are. Or in a garage.
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Ours was the worst of all worlds. Down in the basement right next to the furnace. So, the dust was given the most direct access possible to the airhandling equipment and we have to lug that up through most of the rest of the house.
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If the return air opening is in your basement, you should have a "real" hvac guy check out your system. It needs work.

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How do you figure that?

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Some brands of disposable vacuum cleaner bags (Kirby, for example) are VERY good at stopping dust.
I would put such a bag on the outlet of the central vac (yes, it was in the basement, next to the furnace) and let it catch the stuff than got through the main bag.
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No one I know (several) has stopped using their BI Vac. The hoses are actually LIGHTER than pulling any normal type of vac around. IF you have one and the hose is heavy, it must be over 10 years old and can be replaced for less than buying "another" vac.

You don't have one do you ? Taking the dust bucket off the bottom to empty it doesn't require you to spread dust around.

Sure, just dig an underground tunnel for the 2" PVC piping and run electrical conduit out to the shed for the outlet..No PROBLEM !
Nearly all the ones I ve seen are mounted in the (attached) garage. If there is no garage, then I ve seen one in a crawlspace.

I suggest you stick with the regular push vac.
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Well in this 39 year old house we do. It's an ancient Eureka some 50 years old, basically the same design as the Hoover my mother had pre WWII. Bags for Eureka still cheap and easy to obtain. Two or three relatives have newer homes with central vacs. but don't use them! One of these days I may get hold of a central canister unit and install it it in shed #2 which is contiguous to the house. With a full but unfinished 48 by 35 basement workshop it would not be too hard to install a number ot outlets and the unit would be most convenient for also dusting the workshop. The attached garage is on the N.East side of the house and is more windy. The shed is already wired and its door facing S.East much less windy. Thanks for the comments. I think my son found a spare hose. in house he recently bought. But no central vac! Also got a couple of wet/dry shop vacs' both have been rebuilt into plastic 5 gallon pails/buckets because their original tin canisters rusted out! At least one of them is otherwise about 40+ years old!
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I see total instal cost as the reason they are not used [ if thats true] , id say they are better and the hose is lighter not heavier.
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We have had our Vacuflow for about 25 years. We love it. No vacuum stink. Our's is in the basement and vents to the outside. We have had a few clogs, but nothing a plumber's snake could not handle. Ours does three floors, the basement and garage. I started to look at them for the motorhome.
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Exactly. They can and should be vented to the outside, so that any odors wind up outside. My house had a CV when I bought it which was vented into the basement and it did produce an odor when running. I simply added the piping to the air outlet and routed it outside. Very happy with it. Replaced the head and hose about 10 years ago and they are much better. Biggest improvement is the AC wire is now hidden in the hose, not clipped on externally.
I do notice that they are not being included in almost all new builder homes today. So, I guess they are not an A list item for people, even $1mil homes here in NJ usually don't have them now.
We have had a few clogs,

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On Jun 20, 8:46am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

.
Yup, clogging! That was going to be another question; our first question about a CV being powerful enough to dispose of sawdust etc from basement workshop was already answered; it's not! We guess if a sock or large piece of tissue gets sucked into the system it could cause a problem? However if we were to install one here the basement is unfinished we presumably could have clean-outs with screw on covers or something at useful locations. If mounted in our shed (to get dust outside the house) which is attached to the house the longest run would be about 50 to 60 feet! The thought of sixty feet of pipe without any way to get into it except by cutting the pipe is not thrilling! Or is that not a concern.
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...
Fifteen years of use here, with no clogs. I think with prudent usage, it should not clog. A sock wouldn't even make it through the power head. Even if it did get clogged, you'd have a good chance of opening it with a simple snake.
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Ours is the most appreciated appliance in the house. We put the vacuum unit in the garage, I just love the thing, and find it easier to work with a simple hose than dragging around acanister or upright. The best part is that you know all the dust has been removed from the house, as there is no bag seepage possible because the bag is in the garage. I cant recommend a whole house vacuum enough, just love it.
When piping them you have to make sure any upward flowing pipes enter the trunk line from the top so if a marble or screw gets in the line it can go up and over and down into the trunk line instead of rattling trying to enter the trunk line in turbulance. Also its a good idea to run 2 pairs of low voltage wire to each outlet (thermostat wire is good), this way if a carpenter shoots a nail through a wire you will have a spare pair.
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