Building TV Wall Mount

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I'm looking to buy a new LCD TV (42" to 50", haven't quite decided yet), and I know enough not to buy accessories from the local electronics store (Don't get me started on HDMI cables...). So, I'm looking to build a custom wall mount. I'm thinking aluminum l-bars. I'm wondering if anyone has any experience and can contribute some do's and don'ts on the subject.
Thanks, John
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Yes, don't waste your time and money. You really want to get a proper VESA standard mount, with the whole variety of hardware, screws, etc., which vary from TV to TV. Try monoprice.com . They also have wall boxes for the cables to go through into and out of the drywall. They have a pile of low cost HDMI cables as well but they tend to be very stiff, and could be problematic trying to attach to a close to wall bracket
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Cables are very expensive at the store. That's why I make mine myself.

The advantage of building one's own tv mount is that the tv is one of the most expensive appliances most people own, and he can learn a lot about construction when he sees why the tv has fallen off the wall.
Other do-it-yourself projects don't have that advantage.

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RBM wrote:

cleat-style mount to hang it like a picture would be easy, but if you want any tilts and swivels, by the time you invent all the parts, you may as well order it online. I've only got so many years left, etc, and the list of chores I <have> to do keeps getting longer without inventing new ones.
-- aem sends...
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John wrote:

Unless you want to do it for the sake of fun and have time for it, buy one off eBay and done with it. Our 60" Plasma panel is sitting on a custom stand with all the accompanying stuffs stored underneath on divided .shelves (A/V amp, HD cable top box, Blue ray player, Karaoke, VCR/DVD-R) We like to watch TV at eye level or little lower. I don't like to look up the screen(bad for the eyes)
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Tony Hwang wrote:

I never did understand why people actually liked to sit in the front row of the theater.
Jon
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Jon Danniken wrote:

I don't know about live theater, but in movie theaters in England a long time ago the cheapest seats were in the front and the very back. I think the most expensive were in the front few rows of the balcony.
Perce
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On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 08:21:31 -0800 (PST), John

I just made a swinging bracket for my new 40" because I couldn't find one that did what I wanted (starts 90 degrees from the mounting surface, flush to it and ends up 180 degrees and 6" out from that surface). I used 3/4" plywood and 3 sets of door butts to get the geometry right. 2 additional struts keep the angle of the screen correct for any swing angle.
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http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10828
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On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 11:43:37 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Wow! When I needed a good strong mount they were over $300, but that was about 4 years ago.
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Yup. I got this one:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product . asp?c_id8&cp_id828&cs_id82807&p_id610&seq=1&format=2
Very simple; no tilt and swivel, but very thin. Under $20.
It was complete with all the necessary hardware. Marked up the wall, drilled some pilot holes into the studs and fastened it with the supplied lag screws. Hang the TV on the mount and done!
I live in earthquake territory and if the house is still standing after the Big One, the TV will still be in place. It ain't movin'!
Someone mentioned that the Monoprice HDMI cables are stiff and suggested that might be a problem. Be aware that the GOOD quality cables will be much stiffer than the cheap crap. Stiff is good (as the actress said to the Bishop)!
But if the HDMI connectors stick straight out of the back of your TV, just get one of these little gizzmos to make the 90 degree turn down the wall:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/search.asp?keyword=hdmi+port+saver&x=0&y=0
Problem solved.
--
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Gary Player. |

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More copper == good
More shielding layers == good
More rigid (versus flexible) insulation == less prone to damage == good
The more rigid insulation materials are used because they're typically more fire resistent == good and frequently required by code for in wall installation
A more rigid cable can be more securely terminated at the connector == good
Highly flexible cables can be bent around a very small radius. That's convenient but for most types of coaxial and HF signal cables, but tight radius bends are very bad. They increase losses and unwanted reflections
Thin, flexible, cables are often convenient. But whether it be HDMI, coax, USB, Ethernet or whatever, durability is typically a huge issue and poor HF performance frequently leeds to "soft" failures of the system even though the DC continuity checks out fine.
I've had bitter experience with premade coax jumper cables running between cable boxes, VCR's and TVs. Those nice flexible cables failed all of the time. The nasty rigid cables that the Cable Guy made for me work every time and never fail!
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Gary Player. |

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Yes, I know it's possible.
But nobody makes consumer products that way. It's all about cost and highly flexible cables are almost always thin, cheap, and crap quality.
And it's not only about the copper. It also has to do with the insulation and dielectric components. Some HF cables user air as a dielectric -- it's really flexible and cheap! Bending the cable around a tight radius is very easy. But it clobbers the HF performance.
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The mounting holes on the back are fairly standard.
Here I hope to inspire you: http://househomerepair.com/Home_Organization/Make-a-HD-TV-Mounting-Kit-Part-1-of-2.php
--
Colbyt
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On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 16:49:06 -0500, "Colbyt"

6mm threaded holes in a 200mm square.
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On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 08:21:31 -0800 (PST), John

I built a corner mount for a 50" plasma screen. I used pine 2x4s and two gate strap hinges so the screen can tilt easily. Also the screen height can be adjusted up or down about 2 feet. Used lag bolts into the wall studs (6 locations) and I did a few chin-ups to make sure it was sturdy. I found (metric) machine screws from an auto store that fit the threaded holes in the back of the screen. Cost: about $25 (2x4s, hinges, chain, lag bolts, washers). I over-engineered the mount which is mostly unseen, but kept the cost low.
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Don't bother. You can get an excellent bracket for much less dollars than you can make one.
And solve the HDMI problem too.
Just get thee to monoprice:
http://www.monoprice.com/home/index.asp
The prices, quality, and service are all seriously top-notch. They've always had what I needed, for a great price, and very fast delivery too.
You'll have everything you need for less than you'd pay for the basic materials at any retail outlet.
I can't recommend them highly enough.
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Why custom? Who's going to look at it? Get the cheapest commecial mount that has the features you need. Most people do just fine with a $60 wall mount which is little more than two brackets: one for the TV, one for the Wall that hook together.
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