Building code - mechanical door/utlity room

I need to seek some net widom on a question a friend of mine asked me tonight.
My friend had a new boiler (hot water heat system) installed and the installers told him that he needed to have a "mechanical door" installed on his utility room if there are bedrooms in the basement (and there are).
What exactly is meant by a "mechanical door"? My friend thought this implied a door with a closer attached to it but I've never seen a residential utility room door with a closer. The original boiler (60 years old!) had to be replaced due to failure of some internal parts which resulted in a CO problem in the house (thankfully he had detectors.) I wonder if this "mechanical door" is being suggested as a stop gap measure for future CO issues but that doesn't seem likely because even the gap at the bottom of the door would not seal CO.
The house is in Ft. Collins CO.
I'd like to just get some net wisdom on the subject I can share with my friend.
Next steps lacking any feedback will be to probe the HVAC installers for more detail and/or call the city building inspector for more insight. I assume a permit was pulled for this job and if so shouldn't the installer finish the job to meet any inspection?
Thanks for any insight.
John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
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Check your local code. It may require a fire rated door. The new boiler should also have an outside air intake for combustion air.

They may have pulled a permit for the install of the boiler. That is all they are required to do. They have no responsibility for the door, use of adjacent area, etc. That is up to the building owner to comply with codes. If he has bedrooms in the area he should also check the code for other requirements, such as a means of egress.
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Mechanical doors with closers are usually a fire code related requirement.
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John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
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It may just mean that a room with a boiler is called a 'mechanical room' and you need a door for the room. As was mentioned , check with the local building inspector and see what he says as he may have to pass it on inspection.
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It means not a bifold door, not a curtain rod hung door, not a bamboo louvered door, etc.. Only your local code enforcement office can tell you what they require: NEC states minimums, local codes often add to that.

Depends on your contract; what does it say? What did you agree to? Is this contracter insured, or is he operating on YOUR/their insurance? If he's not insured and can't show proof of insurance as required, then he's on YOUR/their insrurance!
You DON'T KNOW if a permit was pulled? You'd better find out whether it's required and if so, GET ONE! You/he/they could be required to undo everything, all the work, that's been done! And hope there are no gotcha's in it. And if it's not part of our contract, the undo would be at your expense, not the contractor's.
I know I sound a little critical, but those are important points, especially getting the final word on your question from the relevant code enforcement office for that location; they can differ from area to area.

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