Building a closet...need some help

I live in a ranch style house that has a room above the garage. I'd like to install a closet so that I can "officially" count this room as a bedroom (there is also a window in the room). All of the websites that I've visited seem to recommend framing a closet in the existing room, but I'm wondering if it would be possible to cut into the wall to frame a doorway then build the closet on the other side of the wall? The room is narrow and the ceiling is pitched, so framing a closet in the room would look really awkward. Do anyone know where I could find step-by-step plans for a project like this? The other side of the wall runs into the attic, so I should have plenty of room. I would just need to install a sub-floor.
Thanks in advance,
Nail-in-Thumb
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On 6/9/2009 11:50 AM Nail-In-Thumb spake thus:

Of course. Often done this way; the closet is actually in the room on the other side of the wall, but opens into the room w/the sloped ceiling. Nothing special about it: just frame it in the other room, then wall it in on both sides and finish the walls. (You'll want to design it so it doesn't look funny in the other room.)
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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the other room is the (unfinished?) attic.
that's what a walk-in closet looks like, from the outside. don't forget to insulate the closet walls.
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re "Do anyone know where I could find step-by-step plans for a project like this?"
If you were going to frame the closet inside the room, would you still have asked for plans?
If not, then you shouldn't need step-by-step plans to build the closet in the attic space.
The only thing I see that might change is that you are going to have to remove a stud or 2 from the existing wall. As long as it is not a load bearing wall, just frame out that area for the door, just like you would have framed it if the door was "in the room" instead of "in the wall".
If it is a loadbearing wall, then you'll need to add a header. DAGS "installing a header" and you'll get lots of hits.
Just don't cut into any of the rafters unless you plan as some major structural work.
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Nail-In-Thumb wrote:

into a bedroom by adding a closet. Got that. What is on the other side of the wall you plan to cut through? Another finished room? Attic space behind a knee wall? And how is it a ranch if it has two stories and a 12-12 roof? Or is this a one-story with a garage below? Having trouble drawing a mental picture here. If it is a knee wall you propose putting the closet in, probably not a problem unless the knee wall is part of the load structure for the roof, in which case you will need a header, which will make for a mighty short closet unless the room is really narrow.
Can you post exterior and interior pictures somewhere, and put a link back here? A picture is worth several thousand words in cases like this.
-- aem sends...
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Nail-In-Thumb wrote:
>> Nail-In-Thumb wrote: >>> I live in a ranch style house that has a room above the garage. I'd >>> like to install a closet so that I can "officially" count this room as >>> a bedroom (there is also a window in the room). All of the websites >>> that I've visited seem to recommend framing a closet in the existing >>> room, but I'm wondering if it would be possible to cut into the wall >>> to frame a doorway then build the closet on the other side of the >>> wall? The room is narrow and the ceiling is pitched, so framing a >>> closet in the room would look really awkward. Do anyone know where I >>> could find step-by-step plans for a project like this? The other side >>> of the wall runs into the attic, so I should have plenty of room. I >>> would just need to install a sub-floor. >>> Thanks in advance, >>> Nail-in-Thumb >> Clarify, please. You want to convert a 'bonus room' (aka garage attic) >> into a bedroom by adding a closet. Got that. What is on the other side >> of the wall you plan to cut through? Another finished room? Attic space >> behind a knee wall? And how is it a ranch if it has two stories and a >> 12-12 roof? Or is this a one-story with a garage below? Having trouble >> drawing a mental picture here. If it is a knee wall you propose putting >> the closet in, probably not a problem unless the knee wall is part of >> the load structure for the roof, in which case you will need a header, >> which will make for a mighty short closet unless the room is really narrow. >> >> Can you post exterior and interior pictures somewhere, and put a link >> back here? A picture is worth several thousand words in cases like this. >> >> -- >> aem sends...- Hide quoted text - >> >> - Show quoted text - > > Thanks for your reply...Sorry for taking so long. I had to find a > better camera. Yes, the ranch is one story, but the room is directly > above the garage. Directly behind the wall in this particular room is > attic space. It seem that I have one support beam behind the wall, > which might be a problem. I know it's possible to construct a closet > because a house down the street (same floor plan) was bought, > remodeled, and then immediately sold. Since my wife is a real estate > agent, I was able to see the house and noticed the addition of the > closet. Unfortunately, I didn't get into the attic to see how it was > done. Would it be possible to somehow maintain support to that beam > and cut out a portion of the plywood so that their will be enough > place to add the closet? Since I only need around 30 inches or so, I > don't think it will be a major problem. I was thinking that I could > somehow brace the beam to the floor instead of the base of the wall. > Hopefully, the pictures will help. > > Thanks again in advance , > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/39429725@N05/3626202348 / > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/39429725@N05/3626204794 / > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/39429725@N05/3625432719 / > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/39429725@N05/3626247170 / > >
Okay, that helps. Took a little staring at the pictures, but I think I understand now- the 'bonus room' is sort of in a dormer above the garage, with a stairwell leading up to it, right off the garage door to the kitchen? Those ducts in the pictures run parallel to the stairwell wall? Is the wall you highlighted the only wall where a closet would work?
The wall at right angles to stairwell does not appear to be a load bearing wall. However, the horizontal 2x4 looks like a collar tie. You do not want to remove or cut that without adding something else to do what it does, first. Another tie higher up, plus a plywood gusset on the truss up high, would probably work. You also do not want to cut the truss visible in the foreground of the picture. Rather than a normal closet, I would go for a old-style built-in cabinet there. Starting maybe a foot above floor level, make an opening in the wall cutting through the second stud over from the corner, and frame it in like a window rough opening. Invent something to take the sideways load of the collar tie before you cut it out. Build a plywood box to go in the opening. To get it to go as deep as possible, you will have to slope the back bottom edge of the box. If you have ever seen a china cabinet tucked into the dead space above a basement stairwell, that is basically what I am talking about. Don't forget to insulate the outside of the box, or it will be an oven in there in summer, and a freezer in winter. A surface-mounted cabinet style door or double door over the front will give more space than a typical closet door. Cabinets like this were quite common in cape cods and finished attics from the 1800s through the 1960s. Most were not high enough to put a hanging rod in them, but it looks like you have barely enough height for that. For more storage, you could do narrow plywood boxes as cubbies in the stairwell wall, above the level of the attic floor.
Standard disclaimer- I am not an engineer, and I have not done a site survey of your house. Consider this advice worth what you paid for it. If you are nervous about cutting away portions of your roof structure, consult a local remodeler. Or go knock on the door of the 'twin' house you mentioned, and ask if you can take photos and measurements in their attic. (I'm serious- most homeowners, once they understand the situation and are convinced you are not a wacko, don't mind sharing.)
-- aem sends...
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While looking at your pics. I see a portion of the ceiling (floor of the attic) trusses peeking up thru the insulation. Hopefully its just pushed aside by "traffic" and is actually/properly at least 10" thick. Also, I see some exterior wall sheathing plywood where the insulation has been pulled aside. You should consider fixing that while yer "in there".
I can't say much for the A/C "flexduct" guys installation ...Duck taped to the studs etc.. What crap !
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