Building 20' sliding pool poles out of EMT conduit (is it possible?)

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Over the years, I've bought & broken and finally given up on aluminum pool poles from the box & pool stores:

They bend:

They crack:

They kink:

They break:

My wife angrily threw away my prized yellow fiberglass pole after the kids complained of splinters, so I am trying to build a stronger/cheaper/more durable sliding steel pole out of EMT fittings:

But I can't seem to get the fittings right.
Mainly I need a 3/4 to 1/2 inch reducer.
Have you ever created a sliding pole out of cheap but strong (stronger than aluminum anyway) 10' EMT tubing?
What fittings would you use so that you could slide & clamp the two ten-foot steel (EMT conduit) poles together?
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On 5/6/2013 1:03 AM, Danny D wrote:

enough, but its too heavy. The 1/2 emt will bend way quicker than the aluminum poles. The fittings you got look really nice, but none of the electrical fittings are designed to be loosened and re-tightened repeatedly. The fittings are also not made with the ability to telescope.
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+1
And if he's going through pool poles that fast, it would suggest that they are being abused. The ones I've had are nothing special and last many years. The brushes are the problem for me. They only last a season or two before the bristles get brittle and start to fall out.
Also, some of the problems with the pole, ie the cracked plastic nut, may be lessened by storing it out of the sun....
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On Mon, 06 May 2013 07:41:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That's exactly the opposite of my experience! :)
My brushes seem to last forever:

It's my NETS which fall apart in a single season!

The plastic always cracks at the center stress point:

The netting tears at the sides:

Even the aluminum nets have plastic holders that fall apart:

I'm wondering if there's a way to build our own sturdy nets too!
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On Mon, 06 May 2013 07:41:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I must agree the sun does a LOT of damage!
For example, thermometers only seem to last a single year!

And, the strings on the floating dispensers always crumbles!

Even the vacuum hoses start falling apart in just two years!

Lest anyone say they can't make plastic last outside, witness the recycling cans, which NEVER fall apart (even outdoors every day and subject to tremendous forces when being dumped):

QUESTIONS for the problem solvers:
Q1: Do they make a thermometer that will last in the sun? Q2: What strings do you use for your floaters anyway?
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I have one of these:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wireless-Pool-Thermometer-Indoor-Outdoor-/330772358 634?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4d0391a5ea#ht_3374wt_915
It's lasted two seasons so far.
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On Mon, 06 May 2013 10:26:58 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Hmmm... a wireless thermometer ... http://tinyurl.com/btapuly
How does it work?
Do you stick a transmitter in the pool and it transmits to the thermometer on the deck?
Can it handle the pool & the spa?
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The transmitter floats in the pool.

Sure, just buy two.
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On Mon, 06 May 2013 11:04:57 -0700, Oren wrote:

Hmmm.... it seemed logical.
First off, the floaters clearly have holes for this purpose. Secondly, out here anyway, we have strong prevailing winds for the summer and winter which move the floaters to one end of the pool permanently unless they're tied down.
Only the floater in the spa stays put; but the other two floaters will be in the same spot all day if I didn't tie them to the middle.
As an update, I bought a screening kit to make new pool nets out of window screen. That window screen kit came with rubber 'cord'. This black rubber cord seems to be a 'perfect' size for the floater holes; but, of course, only time (and chlorine) will tell the complete tale...

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wrote:

Because they have a loop for a string doesn't mean you're required to use it. There is no harm in having it at one end constantly. Mine used to float all around but if the water level was just wrong, it would get hung up in the skimmer, blocking it and causing the pump to suck air - not good. I tied it to one of he ladders with a shoelace. It would get ratty a couple of times a summer and I'd just use the other one.

So what?
<...>
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On Tue, 07 May 2013 11:12:32 -0700, Oren wrote:

It's night now, but I can snap a photo of the floaters in the morning. Clearly the holes are put there for strings. No doubt about it. Plus, the strings serve a useful purpose by keeping the floaters where you want them to stay, especially when it's windy.
Googling, I tried to find mention of the string tying feature, but it seems to be either so obvious they don't mention it - or - so unusual.
None of these mention the tie down holes: (Amazon.com product link shortened) http://www.yourpoolhq.com/floating-chlorine-dispenser-for-3-inch-tabs.html (Amazon.com product link shortened) http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item@0464687600&item@0464687600 (Amazon.com product link shortened) etc.
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I've bought floating thermometers that came with string. I would agree, that's what the holes are for. A lot of people want the thermometer to be in one convenient place. On the house side, for example, so that you can walk out, read the temp, without having to figure out where it is, walk all the way around to the other side, etc.
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On Wed, 08 May 2013 10:58:04 -0700, Oren wrote:

That's a good idea, because the thermometers I have always seem to be unreadable after a year in the sun (and the blue torpedo type sinks to the bottom of the pool so it can't easily be retrieved).
I like the clever idea of putting the thermometer in the skimmer baskets (out of the sun but still in the water).
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I had one fall apart, took me weeks to find the glass on the bottom of the pool. So, two in at least 15 years.

Strings on thermometers, never any decay. Don't use floating dispensers but the chlorine might be an issue.

Nope, 5-10 years from hoses, even when I step on them.

Ever try to get the recycling people to take away a plastic recycling can that has fallen apart? Still trying.

Mine hangs from the ladder which is on the south side of the pool so it doesn't get direct sun. It's underwater anyway, I wouldn't expect much affect from the sun.

No floaters, but it's string. Cheap to replace.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

+1
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On Mon, 06 May 2013 06:53:59 -0400, RBM wrote:

I was afraid of that.
The good news is that I don't really need to telescope. The pool is 9 feet deep, so, I just need, oh, I don't know, 9 feet plus 5 feet = 14 feet (or so) of pole.
So, it's not a requirement that it manually be adjusted to size more than just once.
But, they 'do' have to fit together, so, that's why a 3/4" to 1/2" fitting would be perfect, if I could find one.
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On 5/6/2013 12:37 PM, Danny D wrote:

not sure what the smallest size would be, but it comes in 20 foot lengths. If its not too heavy, you could possibly cut a 14 foot piece of that.
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On Monday, May 6, 2013 12:37:15 PM UTC-4, Danny D wrote:

No, it wouldn't.
That junction would be tremendously weak, and would likely break the first time you used it. It is not intended to be a structural connection.
In order to have any strength at all, the smaller tube needs to telescope INSIDE the bigger tube for some distance. It needs to be a snug slip fit or it will flop around either kink the inner tube or split the outer tube.
Try telescoping the 3/4" and 1/2" together. It's too sloppy of a fit. It will never work as-is.
If you're a machinist you could turn some bushings out of brass or steel to take up the slack, but if you were a machinist you'd have thought of that solution already.
Redneck solution involves wrapping the smaller tube with electrical or duct tape to take up the slack. Drill for a cross pin to hold the pole at a predetermined length. Multiple holes in the smaller tube to make it adjustable.
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On Tue, 07 May 2013 10:45:47 -0700, dennisgauge wrote:

Thanks for that suggestion. That's what will try, if no coupling works.
I'll post pictures when I'm done.
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On Tue, 07 May 2013 13:50:03 -0700, Oren wrote:

I thought about wood but couldn't find a wooden dowel long enough. 14 feet seems just about right.
I had trouble finding the price for them at that web page, so I'll call 'em in the morning: 866-663-6935 http://woodproducts.caldowel.com/1-3-4-x-72-Dowel-Rods-Oak.aspx
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