Builder did not leave enough room for standard fridge

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attached to a 12 or 14 inch base. There is already plenty of hard-to-reach space there. I think the proper answer is to replace the corner unit with a lasy susan base unit, like used to be standard for 'problem' corners in kitchens. The filler panel on the return side next to fridge opening looks big enough, bt no way to tell for sure without being there.
aem sends...
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On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 20:18:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

OH yeah, when the time comes sue both of them. Otherwise, she'll say it's his fault and he'll say it's her fault at the separate trials. By having on ly one trial, they can do this but the judge decides.
I'm not sure in every state you can sue both in small claims court.
Remind them of how much time they will have to spend in court, and they will lose, and get the builder to just fix it now.

If she is the builder's agent, I think she is as liable as the builder.

Is this the same person who was having trouble with his agent out of town a month or two ago?
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I'm not being overy cynical but you (the OP) is only ASSUMING that the cabinets are in wrong. It could also be that the cabinets are as approved and that the room has been made smaller by misplacement of walls OR (and this is scary) that the house is the wrong size and everything got measured from the outside walls.
While both of these scenarios are unlikely, I thing the OP can't go any farther without reviewing the plans and getting some accurate measurements.
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http://s155.photobucket.com/albums/s290/dawn3432/House/June4/?action=view&current 7-4797_IMG.jpg
others screwed up? Do you have plans showing the kitchen the way it is? If so, you have a problem. They will agree it is a compromise with usefulness, but given the space and design contraints it was the best they could do, and since you agreed to it.... If not, then you have a right to a properly designed kitchen.
There might not be a reasonable fix though. Putting the refrigerator there just isn't practical. Even if the builder wants to help you out, there might not be a way to do it; he won't pay for the expensive fridge and you probably wouldn't want it.
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What does your floorplan state for sizes? If they screwed up, they should fix it ASAP. If you signed off on it, then you can ask for it to be fixed and ask How Much.
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I get it now. The cabinets end just before the doorway. So you do have to make the first one narrower, or like someone said, make the door narrower, I don't know what to do about the drawer..... well, gEt a whole new cabinet with no drawer, and one more shelf inside the narrower door.
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I have not seen the plans that YOU provided, but if you had anything at all to do with the design then you need to fix this NOW at YOUR expense.
The cabinets definitely need to come out rather than everybody having to find a special fridge. I don't see the big deal. Just do it and worry about who pays later. Read the first paragraph again.
No, the Realtor sells houses, she is not a construction foreman. If you did something long-distance, then you did a poor job. Again the problem is 90% yours. You are the honcho on this and you screwed up with your design.

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wrote:

"built-in" look. From the picture it appears the corner cabinets are mostly wasted volume due to inaccessibility no matter what kind of refrigerator you buy, and when you add the larger refrigerator that part of the kitchen is going to be unattractive and appear very crowded. Also, with the larger refrigerator your cabinets over the refrigerator are going to be very difficult to use.
If this were my house I would do two things --
(A) Extend the lower corner cabinet out and provide a double-opening door, with a lazy-susan interior to let you use the space. This will give you a lot more cabinet space for things like pots and pans and storage units than you now have. I would also consider doing the same thing with the upper corner cabinet, although that space is more accessible. This also means a change to the counter-top to fit the new counter dimensions. Save the old cabinet and use it in the garage for storage or tools.
(B) Buy a counter-depth refrigerator to make that end of the kitchen more usable and appear less crowded. This will also make the overhead cabinets more accessible and useful. (If my budget were big enough in this case I might even try for a built-in refrigerator, but now you're talking real $.)
Making these changes will provide a better appearance and more useful kitchen.
Sidenote: With new construction I don't think these sorts of conflicts are unusual, and a good homebuyer ought to hold an additional 10-20% of the price in reserve to meet needs that weren't anticipated when the project was first planned -- whether it's interior upgrades, new equipment, or changes that create new requirements such as for irrigation, storm protection, revised building codes or a security system. -- In other words, I don't think problems like this are unexpected, they're just imperfections that will cost money and have to be dealt with. If the contractor was also the designer you may have some leverage, but if he is building to someone else's design these may be costs you have to deal with. Been there, done that -- Regards --
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I'm a painter, in the last 2 years or so I have started seeing the walls behind the fridge recessed for this purpose. So imagine the wall with no cupboards comes along and at fridge point is is set back 4", or 3 1/2", the depth of the stud, outlet for fridge is in side of this recess. Builder may be able to do this for you, wouldn't cost a fortune to cut out drywall, a couple studs and have electricain move outlet over. This is assuming not on an outside wall of course.

http://s155.photobucket.com/albums/s290/dawn3432/House/June4/?action=view&current 7-4797_IMG.jpg
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Sound great -- as you have found out there is NO SUCH THING AS A STANDARD SIZED FRIDGE -- any more than there is a standard sized person. They designed it, they should supply you with a list of makes and models that will fit their cabinet design, or, hopefully, you can get them to re-do the kitchen -- fat chance.

http://s155.photobucket.com/albums/s290/dawn3432/House/June4/?action=view&current 7-4797_IMG.jpg
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clipped

Builder pay for your error? No way. It is part of the plan you should have considered, and hindsight is always 20/20 :o)
Hubby and I were looking at cabinet depth fridge, but they were too high for our kitchen (unless we raise a wall cab.)...prices weren't that different.
Can't tell by the photo what is in the corner to left of frigge...if not too late, can all cabinets be moved forward from the back wall to allow for deeper fridge? If the kitchen work has progressed too far, then it would cost more, probably, to move cabs. than to pay more for fridge.
We have a drawer limited by the fridge, but I just keep small stuff in it that doesn't require it be opened all the way. Price and size of your kitchen appliances should have been planned for from the git-go. Enjoy your new house .. it's pretty.
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Norminn wrote:

Insufficient data to know whose error it is...but, if plan calls for as stupid an arrangement as this appears to be, the "reasonable" doctrine could come into play if it were to go so far as a suit (which, of course, is not what I'm advocating either).
--
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Norminn -
Can you please explain to me how exactly the cabinet issue is MY error. I was told from the beginning that it would fit a standard size fridge. And, now when I go to buy a fridge and measure I discover that it lacks 7 inches of clearance.
I am not exactly sure whose fault it is, but I am pretty sure that I do not hold all or even most of the blame.
Kris

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kris3432 wrote:

It's an opinion, and not well-formed one. Relies on the assumption you had plans to review/approve that show that what is installed is the actual layout on those plans. There's insufficient data to available to asses blame/fault.
I suspect the answer given by the builder was entirely accurate as far sas it went -- a standard width fridge will fit the opening -- as I mentioned earlier, it would be quite surprising if this is a multiple-house development as it appears it must be that the builder actually took sufficient time himself to address the question in more detail than to confirm it's a 34 or 36 or whatever it is wide opening and responding "sure"...
--
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kris3432 wrote:

The issue is that a "standard size" fridge should fit the space. I have no idea what a "standard size" fridge is - mine is 31.5" deep from wall tofront of fridge, not including the handles. You said you kept asking what size fridge you should buy.......sounds like a cop-out to me. You must have had drawings before you signed a contract, I hope. The size of appliances, along with cost, features and arrangement are one of the very most basic and costly parts of the plan. First-time home buyers are bound to make mistakes or overlook things that they think of too late. It may be possible to get a fridge - not side-by-side - that will allow the cab. door and drawer to open if the fridge door is open. Might also be able to change the cabinet door to open from left side (hinge on right) to get into that.
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wrote:

That's not true. I know folks who even their hindsight isn't 20/20.
(I don't know the details of this case.)
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If you let this slide, it will cost you more now (for a frig) and again later when you sell the house.
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
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Hi,
Ouch!
We had a house built and also had the same problem. No magic solution I am afraid. In the end we went for a Counter Dept fridge at about $US 3,000 - ish. It was a while back.
Even though we had an architech design the house. The only way I think to effectively have a "Standard" fridge is to have a closet, or some nich in an adjoining room that you can push the fridge into. Most cabinets are 24 inch in dept. Most counter dept fridges are 27 inches. The extra 3 inches is O.K. What you see is just the doors coming out, the body is flush. You need to have the doors sticking a bit out anyway because otherwise you would need a gap on each side of the fridge to allow for door swing clearance. Difficult to explain, but the corners of the doors when used will push out sideways maybe 1/2 to and inch when you open them.
There are fridges that are 100% flush. However even they "cheat" in that they are more than the standard 24 inches. So you effectively waste 3 inches of space behind the cabinets. See Sub Zero.
Best, Mike.

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kris3432 wrote:

That builder must be a nut. In my time I had 6 houses, a cabin built and never had that problem. I don't remember hearing about it until now. Didn't you go over the blue print B4 building started? Sorry to hear that. Maybe kitchen has to be redone at least partially?
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On or about Sat, 16 Jun 2007 17:39:13 -0700 did kris3432

That just strikes me as an incredibly stupid place to design in a fridge.
Here's a quick and dirty take on how I'd do that kitchen, based on what I can tell from the picture:
http://img79.imageshack.us/img79/1384/fridgekitchenht1.jpg
The space for the fridge is replaced by a normal countertop with cabinet underneath, and a full cabinet above.
The corner is replaced with a single unit that has a lazy susan underneath. Maybe something similar on top, too.
The fridge then goes near the end of the wall, under a half cabinet up top. Doing that, you can leave enough space for an especially large fridge, but still put a smaller one in without there seeming to be a huge gap between cabinets. I drew in a bottom-freezer french-door fridge as an example.
I can't really say how reasonable it would be for you to demand a change like that (or however you'd want to do it), since I don't know how many opportunities you had to correct the design before it was built. But I would definitely not be happy with the design in your picture.
--
- Mike

Ignore the Python in me to send e-mail.
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