bubbling heat

We have a raised ranch that we have lived in for about 6 years that has domestic hot water. This past winter we would here the water bubbling and running through the pipes whenever the furnace kicked on. IT never did that before. Is that caused by air and a need to "bleed' the system? Is that a D-I-Y kind of thing?
Thanks
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do you have a furnace or hot water heat
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Yes, and yes. It's pretty easy to bleed your own radiators, really. The hardest part is finding the right tool to open the bleeder valve. Some of the older ones take a large slotted screwdriver, but the newer type have a square head bolt instead of a screw. You can get a key to turn this type at any plumbing supply house -- but *not* at home centers like Home Depot or Lowe's. You could probably find one at a real hardware store, too, someplace like Ace or Tru-Value, or an independent "Mom & Pop" hardware. Expect to pay about fifty cents.
The circulator pump has to be running when you bleed the radiators. Have a towel handy. Open the valve slightly, until you hear air coming out. It will start to sputter soon, as water comes out along with the air. When only water comes out, close the valve. Repeat for all radiators.
If the problem comes back, bleed them again, because you might not have gotten all the air out the first time. Repeat another time or two, if you observe the bubbling noise diminishing.
If the problem keeps coming back, though, you have a bigger problem. There's not supposed to be air in the system, and you may have a leak somewhere. If you're lucky, it will be a bad bleeder valve that is allowing air to enter the system. Replacing a bleeder valve can be a DIY job if you're comfortable doing your own plumbing with steel pipe. *Shut off and depressurize the boiler first!* Replacement bleeder valves can be obtained at a plumbing supply house for a few dollars. Depending on the type of radiator, you may need to buy some adapter bushings as well, but you're looking at five to ten bucks per valve, tops, to replace them. This is a good time of year to be fixing that stuff, too, because if you mess something up, you have all summer to get it fixed before you need to heat the house.
Good luck!
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wrote:

I never bleed air with the circ running.
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