Brown Lawn, Grubs, ...

I have developed a large brown patch (aprox 200 sq. ft.) in the middle of my otherwise healthy and green lawn. I suspect grubs, but dug up a few places and found none. (This might have been because the lawn is already dead, the grubs have moved on.)
Before I blast the area with grubicide (or whatever it is) does anyone have any advice on a) verifying the problem, and b) treating it, c) getting back to "green"?
Thanks,
Ian
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Maybe it is brownpatch fungus. Get a fungacide liguid at any lawn and garden store, and use a garden house sprayer to distribute. One application is all it has ever taken on my lawn.
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On Wed, 1 Sep 2004 15:18:25 -0400, "Ian Stock \(remove the
:) I have developed a large brown patch (aprox 200 sq. ft.) in the middle of my :) otherwise healthy and green lawn. I suspect grubs, but dug up a few places :) and found none. (This might have been because the lawn is already dead, the :) grubs have moved on.)
grubs will eat the roots so the dead area will lift up like the welcome mat on a fronch porch...if the roots seem to be in tact you might dig up a sq foot section and take to a local nursery to identify what sort of disease may efect what ever type of lawn you have.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
It is said that the early bird gets the worm, but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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The dead turf is more like thatch than doormat. But it does come up easily.
Re: the brownpatch fungus note in earlier response, the area is quite dry with lots of direct sunlight, which I would think precludes fungus.
Ian
wrote:

middle of my

places
dead, the

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Ian Stock (remove the "antispam")" <ianstock"antispam wrote:

easily.
Does not sound like grubs. Take a sample in and find out what it is. Don't treat and kill off everything around, when you don't know if you have anything that needs to be killed.
I have seen several cases of brown spots showing up after a dry spell. The common problems are some buried object, like rock or wood; a natural gas leak, or in a couple of cases, reflections off a window overheating the grass. On occasion dogs can also cause problems.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Ian Stock (remove the "antispam")" <ianstock"antispam wrote:

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More likely fungus or other insects. Lar has the right advice.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Ian Stock (remove the \"antispam\") wrote:

Look at a extension service website for your area. The last advice I read in looking for grubs was to lay back a square foot of sod and count the grubs that you find. Can recall what number is acceptable per sq ft - three?
Has this been a gradual or sudden problem? Warm climate? Mole crickets here in Florida can scalp a lot of lawn. One method for finding them is to saturate about a sq foot of sod with soapy water - tbsp of dishwashing detergen per gallon - wait and see what comes up for air. Interesting experiment, as it causes even earthworms to struggle for air.
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Norminn wrote:

I intended to say "I cannot recall.....". Also forgot what was most important - take a soil sample and a section of sod from the border of your problem area to have them determine what the problem is.
Also, have you applied any chemicals recently? Conditions wetter or drier than normal? How long has the problem existed?
Our condo had large bare areas, but seemed to have no specific problem, other than poor maintenance. A gopher cricket infestation, here, could kill a lot of lawn and be long gone if one did not stay on top of problems. It is also easy to cause damage through improper application of fertilizer and/or herbicides.

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Ian Stock (remove the "antispam") wrote:

It would help to know where you live Ian, but doesn't sound like grub damage. To check for grubs or any other insect check at the border where the lawn is still green. It sounds like a surface feeding insect to me. In our area of Canada I would suspect Chinch Bug.
Peter H
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I'm in Toronto.

of my

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Ian Stock (remove the "antispam") wrote:

I stand by my original guess if you are in the Toront area. When you walk on the dead area does it feel different? If so chances are the root structure is gone and there is little home for the patch.
Peter H
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You might want to post to "alt.home.lawn.garden"
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