Bringing SER cable into PVC conduit sleeve


Hello,
I'm bringing a 1/0 Al SER cable into a short 2" Schedule 80 PVC (RNC) sleeve to a panelboard. What's the proper way to terminate the free end of the sleeve? I could just carefully ream the end of the PVC conduit, or I could glue on a male adapter and use a bushing. Or is there something like a clamp connector for RNC?
Thanks, Wayne
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Hmmm. Tough question. Technically there should be a clamp connector on the end of the conduit. However if it is metal it would need to be grounded. I don't know of any 2" non-metallic cable clamp connectors, but maybe there are some out there. Try the Carlon web site. A male adapter with a bushing might be acceptable to the inspector. Perhaps a strap on the cable within close proximity to the conduit end might also be acceptable.
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Nothing in the Carlon catalog.
Thanks for your help, Wayne
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 05:03:18 GMT, Wayne Whitney

If you polished a soft edge on the end of the pipe it would take a real prick to cite you but legally you *might* need a bushing. When you are using short pieces of condiuit for physical protections some of the rules become ambiguous. Clamp the SE to the wall where it comes out of the pipe and pack the end of the pipe with duct seal to keep the critters/rain out.
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Thanks for the advice, I'll do that.
Cheers, Wayne
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Yes, that should do the trick:
1) Deburr the PVC at both ends - eg: curved file, or sandpaper around a chunk of dowel. (this may be excessively fussy, but it's good workmanship anyway)
2) Clamp the SER close to the conduit, but form the wire so that it's held away from the edges of the conduit - eg: plastic conduit clamps against the wall with a bit of slack going into the pipe. Allows for thermal expansion/contraction and minor pulls and tugs. If the wire is in contact with the edge, even with plastic, vibration and expansion/contraction movement _may_ cut the insulation, even with (tho less than with metal) with plastic.
3) DUX seal the ends of the conduit. You're going to need this in any event.
With metal conduit, you need rubber boots on it, tho, if enclosed in a box, the DUX may be sufficient.
Having a piece of conduit going thru a wall and ending in a box without sealing the conduit is a recipe for a fire: moist air flow + live connections -> corrosion -> heat -> poof.
House down the street burned down because of an unsealed service conduit entering the back of the panel.
The inside end of your conduit is open, and isn't much of a problem that way, but the outside end is in the disconnect IIRC.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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When working with plumbing pipe (plastic or copper) I usually just use a small blade; lately I've found that the manual can opener attachment on my multi-tool works well.

That's right, I'm coming into the bottom of the disconnect after going through an LB conduit body. Let me make sure that I have the connection at the disconnect right: I'm going to use a male adapter, a metal locknut, and a plastic bushing. Carlon make a "flat washer/o-ring" for their male adapter and suggests that they be used outside a box for a watertight connection with a male adapter, so I'm going to track down one of those. Does that connection sound OK?
Thanks, Wayne
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wrote:

It sounds good. You don't necessarily need the O-ring for a bottom entrance. They are usually used for a side or top entrance, but there is nothing wrong with you using it on the bottom.
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Well, I'm going to omit it then, as nobody stocks it around here, it would be a special order.
Thanks, Wayne
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Unless you can ask the inspector first, I'd use a male adapter with a threaded bushing, then strap the cable close to the conduit. I prefer to file the ends of the PVC round and smooth, like gfretwell describes, as it looks better and clamps tight against a flat surface, but I have had knit pickin inspectors reject it

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What clamps tight against a flat surface? You lost me there.
Thanks, Wayne
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When you glue male adapters and bushings on the ends of the PVC, the male adapters and bushings hold the pipe away from the surface you're strapping the pipe to
wrote:

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