Briggs & Stratton Engine Problem

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Starting fluid (ether) is never used by anyone who knows their stuff... 2-cycles (or even 4) are likely to blow-up in your face! Too much carb cleaner will dry the cylinder wall and thin the oil.
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On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 15:22:51 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Perhaps they should stop selling it :)

I would use it on a four stroke any time I work on a fuel starved engine.

If one uses that much; to dry cylinder walls, etc. then they need to re-evaluated their usage.
Or, change the oil :-)
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Key phase here: ...knows their stuff. 8^)
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>"I would use it on a four stroke any time I work on a fuel starved engine."
Key phrase here: knows their stuff. 8^)
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On Apr 21, 6:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I live in eastern MA. I also agree with Husky 99%. I went to the leaf blower manufacturer and they only had a four-page assembly manual with no engine information or details. I went to B&S's web site and then called Customer Service. I was told by B&S the only repair manual they offered (to sell me and I bought) was the "Single Cylinder "L" Head (built after 1981) Repair manual". That B&S manual covers plenty of different models and carbs including mine, but it contains no "principals of operation", or explanation of how any of the carbs actually work. My carb experience is limited to motorcycle float carbs, but I was lucky enough at the time to find an expert forum that filled in the bike’s official service manual carb blank spots.
And that's why I came to this forum. I needed to fill in the big blanks and have been very lucky to learn from all of you and to read Husky's carb tutorial that has filled in a lot of carb blanks, also. IF ANYONE knows of a manual or web site that has an operational description of my carb or a similar small engine diaphragm carb, I'm more than happy and willing to read it and learn.
(The 1% I don't agree with is the implication that I am lazy, stupid, and cheap. I work hard to gather any and all information and data available, I’m of fair intelligence, and have and will spend money to buy tools and manuals to help and guide me to fix engines and appliances I don't feel it's necessary to pay someone $50 an hour to repair for me. To imply otherwise is unfair and demeaning.)
Have you checked to see if the plug is wet when it dies? ---- YES, IT"S a little wet.
Can you keep it running by spraying fuel (use WD-40, not starting fluid) into the carb intake? ---- No, the starter fluid will NOT keep the engine running, but will start it. But I will try WD-40.
Have you tried running the engine with a spark tester in the plug wire? ---- No. I lost my spark tester and I'm buying a replacement.
With the tank half full, does the inner reservoir fill up after a few pulls of the rope? ----- I DON’T KNOW. The tank-top carb covers any possible view of the reservoir. IS there some trick to looking into the reservoir with the carb in place??
Are the little "flaps" cut in the diaphragm curling up or laying flat against the side face of the carb? Did you use a new diaphragm, or just reinstall the old one? ----- THE FLAPS are laying flat against the carb body. YES, I did buy and install a new diaphragm, and when I blew out the carb body, the diaphragm and cover were OFF the carb and not damaged.
Thanks,
Manjo
Manjo
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You're doing a fine job of trying to isolate the problem and learn at the same time. This carb is NOT the easiest to understand. It is an amazing design...but it's almost like they got one person to design this...and them put him back in the asylum.
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On Apr 22, 8:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks. Designing carbs has to be one of the black arts. Trying to understand them without all the documentation is a real challenge.
I'll just keep plugging along. Since I can start it and keep it running at 1/2 choke until it warms up, then go to no choke, I'm good for the short term.
Again, my thanks to everyone here for their input. When I get this fixed so I have full power and it starts with one pull as it did when I bought it, I'll post whatever I found.
Manjo
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wrote:

One more thing I can think of is, if the plug is the right heat range (correct plug number) and the gap is set properly.
As to carbs.. it's fun when they run and you still have ten parts left in the kit box :-))

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Especially with the price of gas as it is...people will try to use old gas and not have any luck starting. Drain the gas if you haven't done it last fall and use fresh gas. (even Sta-Bil has its limitations)
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I'm using the spec Champion spark plug at spec gap and I used 2 different spec spark plugs (the last is brand new).
I'm now assuming and testing for a carb fuel flow problem. I've ordered a new pick-up tube and a spring for the idle screw just to be on the safe side. I have turned the idle screw to several different setting with no starting improvement. I'm going to pull the carb today for the last time and take off all the rubber parts and soak it in Berrymans Carb Cleaner (I have a gallon can with a screen tray for dipping). I did use spray carb cleaner a week ago that "seemed" to help. So I'm thinking a 3-5 minute soak should get any crap and varnish that might still be in the circuits.
As for old gas, I have removed, drained and flushed the tank already and adding freshest gas provides little improvement. The leaf blower seems to run better with 2-3 ounces of Berrymans Carb Fluid mixed with a full tank of gas. Even with the carb cleaner fluid it still takes 2-3 starts before the engine keeps running on 1/2 choke and then after 9-12 minutes I can turn the choke off completely, but the engine does run a lot longer than 2 weeks ago.
(I have been using WD-40, but I haven't needed it the last couple of days. WD-40 doesn't make starting that much easier, but reading about all the down sides of starter fluid in the earlier posts makes it easier to accept a little harder starting using WD-40 when I have to).
Best regards,
Manjo
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wrote:

The times I have soaked a carb I always soaked them overnight or 24 hours. The auto parts store used to sell these kits, with the strainer (tells how long it's been:). It was branded/named GUNK. Drop the carb in and clean the next day. Wash rinsed with water and blown out with an air hose.
Remove jets, screws, etc and drop all the parts into the strainer for a GOOD soak.

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"The times I have soaked a carb I always soaked them overnight or 24 hours. The auto parts store used to sell these kits, with the strainer (tells how long it's been:). It was branded/named GUNK. Drop the carb in and clean the next day. Wash rinsed with water and blown out with an air hose.
Remove jets, screws, etc and drop all the parts into the strainer for a GOOD soak."
Oren...I remember rebuilding my 66 Chev Impala 2-barrel and using lacquer thinner for the soak!
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wrote:

I learned something here about using WD-40, so I'll try this if I ever need to spray a carb intake in the future.
When I have used starting fluid, in the past it has been one or two squirts into the carb. I don't flood the thing, just try to get the engine fired up. I don't have a can now, but WD-40 I have :)
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wrote:

...(magneto) results in up to 10,000 V or more at the spark plug.
read this page..(Testing the magneto)
http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmtstmgto.htm
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Great page. I looked at my multimeter and it can only handle up to 1,000 DCV. 10,000 DCV would blow mine up.
Manjo
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wrote:

Do a "shade tree mechanic" (G) test. Pull the plug, re-attach the wire on the plug and lay the plug on a good ground (scratch the paint) of metal. Pull the start rope and watch the spark. You want to see a bright blue spark and hear it snap.
(The other method is to hold the plug wire terminal in your hand give 'er a yank on the rope:) BTDT.
The flywheel has two magnets inside (not shown in your .pdf file). They can become corroded and a simply cleaning with a fine sand paper can clean them to a shine.
Magnetos do go bad, but very seldom in my experience.
Look on the last page at part #147 (Seal Needle Valve) and part #118 (adjustment screw), If one or both are damaged, you'll not get the proper adjustment.
Examine the tip of the screw for damage or wear. Sometimes they bend the tip of the screw if the tighten them down to far into the seat.
I'm throwing things out there, because I like/want to avoid pulling the flywheel.
Now, have you hit anything last fall with the mower? The flywheel has a shear pin. It can be a small fracture, but the timing is off on the magneto...just a bit.
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Good idea to clean the magneto. I've been hesitant to remove the magneto since it seems to be a pretty close fit to the rotor and I didn't want to introduce another problem, but it's time now. The rotor itself has some light rust that I'll sand lightly, too.
I did a similar spark plug test a few days ago. I left the spark plug in the engine port and put another spark plug in the cap and held it to the top of the first and I was able to start the engine. Although it ran a little slower rpm-wise, the engine functioned close to normal and I could see a spark across the hand-help plug gap that looked good. As the engine slowed down, there was more yellow coloration to the spark and then the engine died. I will try this and your test again just to be sure I’m getting a decent spark after I clean the magneto and rotor.
I haven't chased the valve seat, but I did spray it with carb cleaner and blew it out with compressed air. I checked the idle adjustment needle tip and it looked good: it was straight and did not have any apparent wear or damage to the tip.
I'll check all these things today.
Manjo
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If spark is yellow its weak, it should be white to blue white,
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Here's a wild thought; I read that it's a leaf blower. Is there a belt drive in it? Was thinking of a way to power the engine using a drive to spin the motor - with the plug out and grounded. Long enough to see if the coil overheats and breaks down and loses spark. That would at least remove one of the variables. Having gone through a series of question with a 8 hp briggs L head (finally found an intermittent intake valve) that caused me some pondering before I was able to put the thing back in service shredding the freakin ivy wall on the north side of the property. Pat
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The engine needs to RUN in order to heat the coil to thermal fault. Spinning has little to do with it.
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