Bricks under the furnace?

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Silly Dutch. Half their basments are ower than the ground water table, none are wet. They must have suspended the laws of nature, or might they know a trick?
--
Best regards
Han
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On Sun, 28 Nov 2010 06:04:58 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Don't even boats have bilge pumps? What are they for?
Wikip The bilge is the lowest compartment on a ship where the two sides meet at the keel.[1] The word was coined in 1523.[citation needed]
The word is sometimes also used to describe the water that collects in this compartment. Water that does not drain off the side of the deck drains down through the ship into the bilge. This water may be from rough seas, rain, or minor leaks in the hull or stuffing box.**
[So it's usually mostly NOT from leaks. I guess that's reassuring. ]
The water that collects in the bilge must be pumped out to prevent it from becoming too full and threatening to sink the ship
**Where the propeller comes in.
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2010 18:53:55 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

That's for sure.
I think it strange that the filter started going in easy after 12 inches. All the way to the end. I can imagine the first inch or two being hard, but 12 inches seems strange.
Because of my work bench, I couldn't look in very well, but I coudl get my fingers in and I didn't feel any obstruction at the bottom or top of the filter slot. I thought there might be a big piece of flaking rust, metal that became mostly detached because of rust. But there was nothing like that, and in gneeral there's only a little bit of rust on the bottom of the furnace. Water doesn't seep up through the cement and it's only been wet there a 10 or 20 days total years ago. Still, maybe it's a thin layer of rusty bubbling metal on the bottom of the slot. Which I could scrape or file or chisel off.
I'll take a tape measure with me too. This last time, I was so tired from bending over in a strange way, I just quit when the filter was in.
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On 11/27/2010 9:47 PM, mm wrote:

I WISH a had a typical cardboard-frame filter. No, like an idiot, I had to buy one of those damn fancy air filters, with a 3" thick filter you have to assemble before you can put it in, reusing the frame of the old filter. And it costs 15-20 bucks a pop. Takes forever to get the plastic comb things (3 of them) stuck down between all those folds, and when assembled, it has to go in the box (sitting right on the floor) just SO, or it jams. I don't notice the dust-bunnies growing any slower since I got this thing, or any improvement in my allergies, even with a fresh filter in place. Probably overdue for a change again, now that heating season is underway. I could change a disposable thin filter monthly for probably less money, and certainly a lot less aggravation.
-- aem sends...
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-snip-

Can't you just slide a regular filter into the same space?

I slide a clean BoAir in every 100 hours- I *did* notice a marked difference when I went from the regular filters to the BoAir. I tried a similar looking but much cheaper one and it didn't catch as much junk.
Now I have 2 BoAirs that I swap out.
Jim
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wrote:

The VAST majority of brick today is concrete based, not clay, at least in our area. Autoclaved concrete brick can be as attractive as clay in the lighter colours, and stands up better to our climate. I've not seen many spalled concrete bricks, compared to what I see in clay.
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It's better than nothing!
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There are bricks under my furnace. If not, it will rust in short order is there's any dampness on the floor.
I never heard abotu caulk on ducts. Just use that metallic tape, or duct tape, but use the REAL duct tape sold by heating suppliers, not the cheap stuff sold at Walmart.
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snipped-for-privacy@thenet.com wrote:

I seem to remember seeing something on Holmes on Homes or his new inspection show where the heating people were painting on some type of sealant around the seams on the duct work instead of the foil tape. It was grey in colour and appeared to be very thick.
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2010 11:36:49 -0800, Ned Flanders

Fix your newsreader, you posted this 3 times.....
I'd hate to have to work on ducts that were sealed in that manner. Tape can be removed when needed.
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On Nov 27, 2:56pm, snipped-for-privacy@thenet.com wrote:

re: "Fix your newsreader, you posted this 3 times..... "
Wouldn't that be "newswriter"? ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@thenet.com wrote:

It wasn't my news reader alone it was also my Usenet Server. My connection to the server drops from time to time (ever since my provider outsourced it). The Usenet program popped up a message that told me the post failed so I resent it.
Its not Like I make a habit of triple posting...
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wrote:

Ned it happens every now and then. A couple of others had the same problem, at least they did here.
No big deal!
Colbyt
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2010 18:43:34 -0500, "Colbyt"

Even today my NNTP server has some lag. Now and then they burp...
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2010 22:23:31 -0800, Smitty Two

A razor knife or box-cutter makes short work of it. Just slice the joint - tape over it when you re-assemble - no need to ever remove it, really.
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On 11/27/2010 1:36 PM, Ned Flanders wrote:

My guy uses that gray stuff on all my jobs.
--
Steve Barker
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snipped-for-privacy@thenet.com wrote:

I seem to remember seeing something on Holmes on Homes or his new inspection show where the heating people were painting on some type of sealant around the seams on the duct work instead of the foil tape. It was grey in colour and appeared to be very thick.
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It might be called Duct Sealing Mastic, i used it on my ducks
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2010 13:32:25 -0800 (PST), ransley

I bet the "ducks" were mad! <G>
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Yeah, they hate it when they're stuck to the sealing. ;-)
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