Bricks under the furnace?

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1) I'm getting a new oil furnace in the basement, and the installer wants to put a brick under each corner. ?? Is this something old- timers do? Is it a good idea?
Are the bricks to prevent rusting? There has been water in the basement on several occasions but it only made it to the furnace when the furnace itself was leaking, that is, condensate from the AC was overflowing. And when the water heater leaked, but that's in a pan now. I've learned all the ways water can get on the floor and I don't make the same mistakes anymore. The current furnace about 25 years old only has a little bit of rust at the floor. Why would bricks help?
2) I also read somewhere, "NOTE: If you live in the South, you must seal all joints, and insulate all the new ductwork leaving the furnace." Why just the south? Are joints in hvac ductwork normally sealed with caulk?
For that matter, what about joints in the 6" round metal flue pipes?
TIA
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Also, what do you call those things in the main ductwork that are mostly vinyl, 6 inches high, that clamp on to the ducts at each end?
Are they there to keep noise from getting into the ducts, or are they there to make up for misalignment of the furnace and the ducts.
Thanks again.

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Elevating the bottom of the furnace off the basement floor is a sound practice. Mine sits on 4 8" high concrete blocks. It is not an "old-timer" thing.
All supply side air ducts should be sealed at the joints. Metal tape is the better method. Cheap installers will use duct tape. Never heard of using any kind of caulk.
Better installs will include insulated supply side ducts. This prevents heat loss in the winter and sweating in the summer. Most local codes require insulated duct at this time.
Supply side means the part of the unit that is delivering the warm/cool air and that includes the round ducts.
--
Colbyt
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On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 21:07:41 -0500, "Colbyt"

-snip-
Mine is on 8" block, too. Not only gets it up where it is drier- it also makes it easier to work on.
Jim
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If you had water before, you'll have water again. Maybe next week or next year or next decade. The bricks buy you a few inches of time. The also promote good air circulation around it to prevent rusting. In some cases, it makes it higher, thus easier to service.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But a "few" inches means a LOT of safety. Assume 1,800 sq ft of basement and 6" of support. That's 900 cubic feet of water before the flood hits the furnace gunwales. That 900 cubic feet is almost 7,000 gallons!
Usual faucet flow is in the neighborhood of 0.5 gallons/minute. For the above calculations, an open faucet in the basement would take 14,000 minutes (or almost ten days) before the water level reached the furnace.
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On 11/27/2010 6:45 AM, HeyBub wrote:

if my faucet was that slow, i'd kill myself. I can fill a five gallon bucket in about 30 seconds with mine.
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Steve Barker
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Restricted sink faucets with airators are 0.4-.1.5 gpm, my code is 0.50, but piping and unrestricted slop sink facets, outdoor hose, 3-6 pgm is normal. 5 gpm should be considered. On a flood this summer with sewer backup in maybe 90 minutes I had 4". A smaller basement of 600sq ft would flood, at 5gpm you could awake the next day to 3000 gallons.
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An incomming main of about 65lb 3/4" pipe is about 17gpm. A 1" at 65lb is about 34 gpm, 2000 gallons per hour if it breaks, you could swim in a small basement by morning.
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HeyBub wrote:

As some have pointed out, some faucets act like fireplugs with an output of 65 gallons/minute. If you live in one of these homes, the 7,000 gallon level would be reached in about an hour and a half.
The point is, however, leaving the furnace on the floor would subject it to ruinous 1/4" of water in the original calculation in a bit less than ten hours. Living in the water-hell home, the critical level would be reached in a mere four minutes.
Bottom line: Depending on your water pressure and delivery pipe, by putting the furnace six inches above the floor, you have between 90 minutes and ten days to recognize the problem. If the furnace is left on the floor, you've got between four and 90 minutes to sober up.
All that aside, a concrete floor can sometimes act as a wick to elevate ground water to its surface.
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I think that's the key. If the furnace is put directly on the concrete floor it could be constantly damp. Cement blocks are cheap, and don't burn well.
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On 11/27/2010 8:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Some sort of spacers would make sense. I would use something made out of concrete rather than a brick made of clay, though. Sometimes those turn to dust at inconvenient times. I wish the people who installed my furnace had put it up on blocks. No flooding issues (knock on wood), but that filter housing is a knuckle buster right next to floor. A couple of inches up would have made it easier.
-- aem sends...
-- aem sends...
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In my previous house the furnace (boiler) was on 4" solid concrete blocks. The filter was on the tank. ?? I never worked on it, so don't remember too many details.
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wrote:

My furnace filter was easy to change for several years. I don't know when it changed, but it's not anymore. And I cant' get in there to look at what's stopping it.
A typical cardboard-frame filter, it's hard to get started** and even after I start it, today I had to force it in a little at a time for the first 12 inches, before it slid in okay. **To get it started, I usually end up pushig so hard the bottom carboard edge crumples. That's just makes it harder to push at all later.
An inche or two underneath would help get it started, but that's not the whole problem at all.

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might be a good idea to fix the root cause of wet basement, the ideal time to install a french drain is when the old furnace has left the building.....
at least install the french drain in the area where the new furnace is going.
its hard to work around a existing furnace
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On 11/27/2010 9:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or do it the proper way, and fix it OUTSIDE the house. Bailing a boat is a poor substitute for fixing the hole in the side.
--
aem sends...

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after having installed a exterior french drain, new downspout drains, new sidewalks and steps, and regraded a entire yard...... cost near 9 grand I was the laborer, it took months. 9 grand was supplies like 20 tons of gravel, concrete, supplies and backhoe contractor.
all to fix a wet basement that within months was wet again:( water percolating up thru floor:(
then did the only thing left, $3600.00 for interior french drain that made it bone dry....
if you had tried doing it right only to fail you might better understand my suggesting interior french drains..........
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On Sun, 28 Nov 2010 06:03:10 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Houses should not be built in swamps. If the water table is below the basement floor level you will not have "perculation" problems.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

First time in 60 years my dads and brothers home flooded last April. Normally about 20 foot down but about 11 caused flooding. Missed me by about 2 o3 feet. Sump pumps can't handle it btw.
http://groundwaterwatch.usgs.gov/Table.asp?S94354075025901&sc4&sa=NJ
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden



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I might add you CANT seal water out of a basement, ther best you can do is redirect it......
basements have too many joints and seams they arent a boat:(
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