brick patio question

I am going to build a large brick patio ( 350 sq ft). Since I will only be able to work on it during weekends. I was planning on doing it in sections. My thoughts are to excavate the entire area, then pack my base and then put up screed boards for the sand & leveling. I was going to do it in sections and leave the screed boards buried in the sand and not remove them. If I use treated 1x4 it will take quite a while for them to rot. Does anyone see a problem with doing this? Is there another way to do this in sections over 6-8 weekends? Thanks JD
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Just my opinion, but I think it's a good plan.
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|I am going to build a large brick patio ( 350 sq ft). Since I will only be | able to work on it during weekends. I was planning on doing it in sections. | My thoughts are to excavate the entire area, then pack my base and then put | up screed boards for the sand & leveling. I was going to do it in sections | and leave the screed boards buried in the sand and not remove them. If I | use treated 1x4 it will take quite a while for them to rot. Does anyone see | a problem with doing this? Is there another way to do this in sections over | 6-8 weekends? | Thanks | JD | |
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Sounds good to me. Treated 1x4 should last at least several years even in direct contact with the ground. If you are really able to do it within 8 weeks you probably don't even need treated lumber (of course I'm sure we've all started projects that take longer than we expect so the treated might be good insurance). The only possible complication I can think of would be if you got lots of rain and your screed boards warped. I suppose you could go to the trouble of sealing them up (maybe with some Thompson's Waterseal) if that really worried you.
Good Luck
JD wrote:

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Where do you live? Do you have freezing weather?
We built a 1100 sq ft brick patio this summer, and also did it in sections. When we finished one section, we'd remove the screed pipes, fill the groove with sand, tamp it, and move to the next section. Worked great.
If you get freezes, wouldn't the frost heave push the boards back up?
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Sections are a good idea. I did my 3 car driveway & large patio. I used the actual plastic edge product sold for pavers. You may want to use a solider (stood up on edge) course of brick instead of wood. (we live in a frost area)
TP
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We did a soldier course on the edge, but the bricks are laid so that the long edge is perpendicular to the edge (if that makes sense).
We also used the Brickstop aluminum edging, and it is very sturdy.
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Thanks to all. I live in SE Virginia and don't really get very many freezes. I don't even drain my irrigation system. I believe I will go with the plan, but only put in the screed section boards in as I go along. I plan to use soldiers or edging along the curved edge where it will join the lawn. to keep the edges from rolling into the grass. Thanks once again to the group JD

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