brewing coffee

Page 4 of 4  
On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 23:34:32 GMT, Joseph LIttleshoes wrote:

A few days ago I wanted a cup of coffee ... pulled out the Folger's decaf that's been in the cupboard since last winter. Used double the amount since it was so old. Put it in a bleached paper filter in a plastic cone over a double-insulated plastic mug. Boiled the water and poured. It was awful.
More seriously, I read a couple of research articles a few years ago which demonstrated that coffee not filtered though paper could raise blood cholesterol levels. Not very much, maybe ten points (mg/dl???) for someone who drank five cups a day. Not significant unless you drink a lot of coffee AND have a cholesterol problem. The paper was the significant thing; apparently it absorbs some oil that can raise cholesterol level.
Edward
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edward Reid wrote:

I read recently that decaf has that problem, but not regular.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edward Reid wrote:

"Well..." he typed hesitantly, even fresh instant decaf is awful, even cafinated instant coffee is all but undrinkable.
I never liked using a plastic filter cone or the paper filters either. I am arrogant enough to think they can be tasted in the finished coffee, alter its flavour in a bad way. Which is why i had pretty much settled on the french press. In Berkeley one can get a glazed ceramic filter holder made in quantity by local crafts people and sold at the Telegraph avenue venors market.
The French press make a decent cup of coffee but i kept breaking them. I remember as a child me Mater using a clear pyrex type glass 'percolator'. I have had as little luck finding an aluminium or steel 'percolator' as i have a glass one. But it was made with much thicker glass and its size & shape makes it more stable than a French press, i would like to get one as i am not against the concept of 'percolators' but feel they must be carefully monitored to insure the best results.
However a 4 cup steel sauce pan works just fine. I have also been lucky enough to stumble upon a 2 dollar a pound ($2.00 U.S. per pound) ground coffee. 8 - 15 dollars per pound makes the individual cup un - enjoyable for me. I only use between 2 ? 2 1/2 lbws. per month.
This particular coffee is a Mexican commercial product, but contains coffee mostly from South America and Vietnam.
Called "Montecito" it is labelled "alimento de calidad" and is "Cafe Molido - espresso de tostado oscuro" i never paid any attention to the idea that it is labelled "espresso", in big letters it says "Ground Coffee" and in smaller letters beneath "dark roast espresso".
But here i get confused, i thought a cup of espresso coffee could be made with any type of coffee, that it was the process by which the cup is made rather than what it is made of that defines it. Though i am aware of coffee ground specifically to be used with an espresso maker, ground extra fine iirc, which the Cafe Molido is not, rather it is an ordinary drip grind. Its even got a 'money back' guarantee printed on the package
"Garantia Incondicional de Montecito;
Si or alguna razon usted no esta completamente satisfecho, devuelva este producto para reemplazo o reembolso completo."
I think it is a excellent product but i am easily pleased.
--
JL

>
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John McGaw wrote:

That could be the answer, but I don't know why my aunt says her other percolator makes better coffee.
As it has always been possible to brew coffee like tea, I wonder why percolators were ever popular. Could it be that people liked the taste they produced?

An electric percolator is thermostatically controlled. I don't see how I could vary the perking time.
The coffee didn't taste burned or bitter, just weak. I have neighbors who make drip coffee with about 1 teaspoon of grounds per cup. That's weak for my taste. Once in a while they'll pour hot coffee in my cup when I haven't asked. If I'm in a hurry I'll add tap water to cool it. The coffee I perked today reminded me of that weak mixture. Maybe boiling destroyed flavor.

Is it worthwhile to try to slow the cooling of the water after contact? How do you measure the temperature? My infrared thermometer reads boiling water at 186 F because there's so much condensed steam above the surface.
What's wrong with paper filters?
When I visit relatives, they let me grind their top-quality beans before each use in their French press. I have a French press but prefer to brew it one cup at a time in a measuring cup. So far I haven't noticed a significant difference between their fresh-ground beans and my store-brand ground coffee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

Using the same coffee grind for, steeped, drip and percolate is a mistake as is using the same amount of coffee to water ratio.
http://www.ineedcoffee.com/05/grinding /
Dimitri
--
I used to eat a lot of natural foods until I learned that most people die of
natural causes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How is this for frugality:
I use a $ 9 coffemaker made in China, a scoop from a can of ground coffee from Walmart, I only change the grounds once a week (add a scoop a day).
The best part is, when I have a group over for coffee, they all compliment me on my coffee and ask where they can buy this wonderful brew :-)
And that's a fact
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You cannot beat camp fire coffee. W W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use a 19.95 Mr Coffee from Target to do coffee. It has one button (on, and off!), no clock, but does a great job. It uses paper filters, and I like the coffee better, even tho it is cooler, than my old Chemex. I use 5 heaping measures for 4 1/2 mugs (but lines on pitcher read 7 cups). To enhance the experience, I keep whole beans in the freezer, and pop them directly into the electric coffee grinder. They seem to grind more evenly when ground frozen. To make up for the tepid brew typical of an electric maker, I preheat the mug by filling it from my instant hot water tap, swishing it around for a few seconds, then filling the mug. An even better brew results if you use filtered water to start with. From the above posts, everyone has his own approach!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have to agree 100% with the electronic scale method. If you use a scoop, the amount of coffee in the scoop will depend on the amount of compression of the grinds when you "scoop" it from the container. If you dig in to a full container of ground coffee the scoop will compress the fragments of the beans making each scoop MUCH heavier then if you scoop into the bottom of the container. If you weight a tightly compressed scoop and compare it to a scoop of lightly compressed coffee you will see the difference. The difference might not be that noticeable in one scoop but multiple that by lets say 12 and you have a very big difference in weight.
The weight method is the ONLY way to get the same amount of coffee in the pot each and every time and this is the only way to make sure each pot tastes the same.
On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 18:56:29 -0800, "Roger Taylor"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What weights have you found for scoops from new and old containers? I weighed one tablespoon from a half-empty can and got 6 grams.
I've been weighing flour for years. If you fill a cup from a sifter, it won't have nearly as much flour as one filled by scooping. Tapping the cup against the table will also make the flour denser. I didn't think this would be much of a problem with coffee grounds. They seem springier than flour.
"Dr. Edmund M. Hayes" wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Measuring by weight rather than volume is best, and easily repeatable. I'm sure the same applies for flour.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sawney Beane wrote:

Melitta makes a one cup thingy that sits on top of your coffee mug. You put the filter and coffee in and pour boiling water in. Voila, one cup of drip coffee. I haven't seen it in years in stores but I would think you could find it online. It's probably about 6-8 dollars.
Bonnie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the reminder Bonnie! I have two of them - one plastic and one aluminum. I'll have to dig them out and give 'em a try. For a quick coffa cuppee, they ain't so bad.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.