brewing coffee

Page 3 of 4  
PanHandler wrote:

Did you calibrate it? In preparation for such measurements, I put a thermocouple into a pan of boiling water and got 217 F.
If I were going to measure the temperature of a drip coffee maker, I'd put my probe into the grounds and close it up. With the machine open, I imagine a small stream of very hot water will lose heat very fast from evaporation and radiation.
With a French press, I imagine the water could cool below 200F as it's poured into the brewing cup. Then the cup probably absorbs significant heat from the water. I wonder how important it is. I wonder if a longer brewing time can compensate for a lower temperature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In a pot of rapidly boiling water at 212' above sea level the reading was dead on at 212. I placed the probe in the stream (tricky to do) for about a minute. There weren't any grounds in the basket to measure, but as the water temp can't be controlled anyhow, it seemed useless to check them had they been there. In a French press the water going in is at 212, and after the press the brew was at 188. The coffee was great, and that's the bottom line!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PanHandler wrote:

I heated two cups to a boil, stirred in case there were cold spots, and brought it to a boil again. I poured it into my French press, which is thin glass, from about four inches higher. In the stream, my probe read 206, which would be 201 F. Pouring took three or four seconds. Immediately, the water in the press read 197, which would be 192 F.
I would normally cover the press to conserve heat. I left it open this time, with no grounds. In approximately two minutes it was 172 F.
One of these days I'd like to keep a probe in the neighbors' drip brewer to see how hot the grounds get.
I figured the best way to keep brewing water near boiling was to boil it in a pan on medium heat, turn off the electric burner, stir in the grounds, and cover. I tried it this morning. I found the flavor similar to that from my aunt's stainless percolator.
Later I tried my usual method with pyrex, a plastic filter, and a ceramic cup. The coffee had the delicious nutty flavor I'm used to. Somewhere I've read that if you've been cutting onions, rubbing your hands on stainless steel will deodorize them because the nickel is a catalyst. I think contact with stainless steel makes coffee less tasty to me. That may include the screen in my French press.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why the 5 discrepancy? Also, your elevation above sea level determines the boiling point. It's 212 at sea level, and becomes lower with elevation.

Percolated coffee ain't the best by any means.

I've never looked into that concerning coffee, but I do know plastic louses it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PanHandler wrote:

dang who would have thought I have seen how the army core of engineers stake elevations the stake literally is a giant nail with the elevation in feet stamped on top
I still think for a quick tidy good cup of joe, use an esspresso maker.
you get one cup at the time no coffee setting to become acidic you can easily regulate each cups strength. some days, I can't pack enough in the little metal cup other days I might go 2/3 rds.
the best thing about this is that, it is very hot. you have to let it set for a few minutes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Man, y'all are HARD CORE on coffee!
I use a Bunn drip machine like you see in offices and diners, but mine is a home model. The water stays hot in the reservoir, and as you pour water IN, coffee comes OUT.
I suppose I could spend an hour or two on the ritual, but for crying out loud, ALL I WANT IS A CUP OF JOE!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


If you DO enjoy a GOOD cuppa joe, spend a couple lazy rainy Saturday mornings learning how to make it the way YOU like it. Once you establish a routine it will become second nature and you'll enjoy good joe all of the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Colonel wrote:

To each his own. I make a carafe full at a time, and let it cool quickly. (It lasts for days in the fridge.) I microwave a cup at a time as I want it. That works well if you make the best you can at brew time.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PanHandler wrote:

You're right, it should be 6 degrees. In boiling water, my thermocouple says 217 F. I'm at 600 feet, so, assuming normal barometric pressure, my boiling water was probably 211.

It was about as good as coffee made in a clean stainless pan.
My neighbor would agree with you about percolated coffee. If I make coffee for him, I must follow strict instrutions. It must be made with 3-1/3 tablespoons of coffee and 12 cups of water in a 10-cup drip brewer. The filter cup, decanter, and hot plate must never be washed. I must not sample even an ounce before the dripping is finished because it will be too stout.
His wife, who used to manage a restaurant, established the recipe. She hates coffee.

I'm sure I'm using coffee-grade plastic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Making coffee is really rather simple.
First, I weigh the coffee (which I store in a pressurized cryogenic liquid-nitrogen freezer at 4.65 atmospheres of pressure to preserve the aromatic esters, etc.) on an analytical balance, which is accurate to +/- 200 micrograms. I usually use between 3.075125 grams and 3.075250 grams per cup. It's not really critical if you keep it between those numbers.
Now for the water. I use distilled water which I buy at the grocery store for 69¢/gallon. To make sure they're not cheating me by selling me well-water, I run the water through two ion-exchange resin columns, one anionic and one cationic. I then check it for conductivity to ensure all dissolved salts have been removed. Then, since distilled water often has an "off" taste, I bubble oxygen through it until it has a dissolved-oxygen level of 17.475 mg/L @ 10°Celsius. Again, the analytical balance comes in real handy here.
I then heat the water in a large pressure vessel I purchased specifically for this purpose to a temperature of 96.0575°C with a tolerance of +/-0.0025°C. Again, it's not really critical if you stick to the proper tolerances – after all, we're just trying to make a cup of java!
Once the water has reached the proper temperature, I put the coffee beans (which have been milled to a particle size of between 200 and 500 micrometers with a standard deviation of no more than 0.0025%) into the water and brew at 96.0575°C for 250 to 270 seconds (brewing time varies depending on how "wild and reckless" I feel that day).
I then decant the coffee through a paper filter, but not just ANY paper filter; I use these pH-balanced hemp-fiber filters which are initially created on a fourdrinier paper machine and then run through calendar rolls by naked Tibetan monks only on months that contain an "R" in their names (it really makes a difference!).
Then, once I have my cup of java, I add sugar and (again, depending on whether I have a "wild hair" that day) pour in approximately 10 ml of either hazelnut, mocha or bubblegum-flavored creamer that I buy at Giant.
Once you get the routine down pat, you can brew a cup of coffee in less than 3 hours!
Yum!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In my 22 plus years in the business of selling gourmet coffee's, I have always been taught to brew coffee at a tempurature of 200 F (+ or Minus 5). If the tempurature falls below 195, you will not extract all of the desirable oils from the grounds and end up with a very underdeveloped cup of coffee. If the temp is too high, it will start to extract the undesireable & bitter oils from the beans. (hence the lousy flavor of perked coffee).
Doug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In a microwave I heated a cup of water to a rolling boil. After I carried the cup eight feet to the counter, my probe measured 217, the same as in a pan of boiling water on a burner. It surprised me that it hadn't cooled a couple of degrees, but it was still boiling.
That would have been 211 F. I put in a tablespoon of coffee, stirred, and measured. 204 F. I let it steep four minutes with a plastic cover to conserve heat. By then the temperature was 189 F. Hmmmm... maybe a foil cover...
A day or two ago, when I steeped coffee in a pan on a warm burner, I probably kept the temperature above 205. I didn't taste bitter oils, but I might have called it underdeveloped. I haven't figured it out unless that metal served as a catalyst.
When I was five or so, I liked to carry fresh coffee grounds in a pouch so I could smell them. I've never drunk coffee that tasted that good, but if I brew it in pyrex and use a plastic filter, the coffee will leave a nice aftertaste for more than an hour.
BiffNightly wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Same as I have heard. Never use boiling hot water (212) keep at 200 above that the bitter oils break down, but some like that bitter flavor, our McDonald's make coffee that has a bitter burnt taste and curls your lips.
--
George C Fahrlender
On-Location Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just an aside to this ..........
A way that I like to make coffee that brews a good cup ..........
Boil the amount of water you want for x number of cups.
Remove from heat, and let stand 1 minute.
Throw in the amount of grounds you like for x cups.
Let it steep like tea for about five minutes. You want the grounds to sink. Stirring helps.
Filter through Melita cup filter and paper filter into individual cups.
Nuke to the right heat.
Works for me.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

What kind of pan do you use? I'll have to experiment more, but it seems to me my stainless pan took something very enjoyable from the flavor.
A microwave is a fairly quick way to boil a cup, and it's on a timer in case something interrupts me. There is a problem. Yesterday my water blew up in the oven. Now I know why experts recommend keeping the oven door closed.
How can I prevent it in the future? They say superheating can occur in a glass container that has never been scrubbed, but this cup has been scrubbed many times in the last twenty years. Should I use a plastic cup scuffed with sandpaper?
I think I'll need to raise the boiling point well above brewing temperature. I could pressurize the kitchen, but that would be a nuisance if the phone rang in the next room. How about adding a tablespoon of salt for to each cup of water? Would antifreeze work better? I suppose the MSDS would tell how much can safely be drunk in coffee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sawney Beane wrote:
...

It's more than just a matter of taste. It depends also on the choice of beans.
I use an electronic scale that reads to 20ths of ounces of halves of grams, up to 5 pounds. I use it frequently when cooking.
...

It doesn't have to be hand cranked. There are mill-wheel models around someone gave me a Braun, the model before the current CafSelect KMM 30, to fix, and when I repaired it. to keep. I had to hold the hand-cranked one it replaced with one hand while I cranked it with the other. It was enough of a chore to make me think of screwing it to the counter top.

Coffee from a French press is much improved by being run through a paper filter. Try it and see how much muck stays on the paper.

I keep the kettle simmering on the burner.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jerry Avins wrote:

can with a tablespoon measurer. Then I was able to compress the coffee about 15%. I dumped the cup and poured the grounds back into the cup with a funnel. They came to the same level that they had with the tablespoon measurer. It seems to me that volume measures of coffee grounds are consistent unless they are intentionally compressed.
IIRC, flour will compress a lot more than coffee, and no two methods of filling a cup yield the same density.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jerry,
Don't forget the average mug is 10 to 12 Oz.
Dimitri
--
I used to eat a lot of natural foods until I learned that most people die of
natural causes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dimitri wrote:
...

Indeed! I get about 6 mugs of coffee out of a full ten-cup carafe.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--------------B2E604F00019DAA0C66C8BC7 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Jerry Avins wrote:

I always toss in an extra heaping tablespoon 'for the pot', if making 4 cups of coffee i use 4 cups of water and 5 tbs. of coffee.
I suppose i have become what ever the opposite of a coffee snob is. About a year ago i broke another french press and wanting a cup of coffee before i went out and bought another press i decided to make 'camp fire' coffee, just boiling the coffee grounds in a cooking pot with water, after it comes to a boil and simmers for a minute i take it off the heat and let it sit for a couple of minutes and then pour. Works fine for me. To the point i have felt no need to buy another coffee pot, French press or otherwise. For guests i will make the coffee the same way but serve it in a decorative coffee pot i have first warmed up with boiling water.
The loose grounds sink to the bottom of the cooking pot and a careful decanting of the coffee leaves it with no residual grounds in the actual coffee to be drank.
--
JL


--------------B2E604F00019DAA0C66C8BC7
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.