Breaking up old concrete

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I don't consider a little bruising a big problem.
No way I'd take 8 days to do something I can do in 1 day.
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On Wed, 09 May 2007 14:53:09 -0400, Dan Espen

One might need three days to clear it with the health executive.
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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I guess we don't have that wuss patrol looking after us around here.

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On Wed, 09 May 2007 18:57:56 GMT, "bill allemann"
If that was the case, vibrating adult toys would be banned.
I'm curious what the Health Executive in the UK warms about that.
The OP mentions a cause for white finger, from vibration. :-))

-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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Correction, not the OP (head bowed).
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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wrote:

Sure, it's not rocket science. The main thing to be careful of is to change the angle slightly every so often as you drill. Drill straight in, and the bit will get stuck. You want to keep moving the bit around a little as you drill so that you make a hole that's maybe 1/8" larger than the bit, on all sides, all the way down.
And wear ear and eye protection.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I agree that an electric jackhammer is the way to go. You're going to be there two forevers doing it with a hammer and chisel. About the biggest hint I can give you on the hammer is get the pointy bit, and always aim towards the center of the blob. Start slow until you get a starter hole, then you can apply more pressure or higher impact rate. Any way you cut it, you have a job ahead of you. I had to jack out a block wall footer, and it was a nightmare with the rebar and no cutting torch.
Steve
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Probably, but I'd suggest a demolition hammer instead. They're lighter and easier to operate, and cheaper to rent.
--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA

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Paul MR wrote:

I had a problem like that once. I ended up digging a very large hole and rolling it in then covering it up. I would really like to be there someday when someone digs up that cube (4' x 4' x 4') and wonders why it was there.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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How thick is the concrete?
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On May 9, 9:15?am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

its hared to beak up when its not firmly anchored.
eaier to do when it was still a wall
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The cross section is roughly triangular shaped, about 18 inches on each side. The length of the smallest piece is about 2 feet and the largest piece about 8 feet. Paul in San Francisco
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For really thick concrete, I once used an electric jack hammer and the best I could do was break off pieces from the edges and corners. That left me with a ball of concrete and I finally did what someone else suggested -- I dig a whole next to the concrete, rolled it in, and buried it.
But, in another case where the concrete pieces were thick (about 12 inches), and not wanting to rent a jack hammer, I used a big crowbar to lift one end, then placed a rock or whatever under the concrete, then hit it with a sledge hammer to break it apart. While sitting on the ground, I could never break it. But when propped up on a rock or whatever, it is much easier to break pieces off. I also use a garden hose to rinse off what I am working on and I can easily since where it is cracking from being hit with the sledge hammer. And, finally, with the big crowbar, if you can find any kind of crevice to work the crowbar into, you can break some pieces apart that way -- more science and leverage and less brute strength and muscle power.

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I've broken up 18" round piers with an electric hammer, the cheap Harbor Freight one, and did it with stitching (hammering a spot for 6 or 8 seconds and then repeating a few inches over). When you get a straight line of the divots all the way across, at some point the concrete breaks along the line. You can actually get a pretty straight cut with this method.

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The common denominator is power tools: jackhammer, 14" or 16" portable gas saws, concrete chain saw, etc.
If you are not able to break it with a hammer after lifting a corner up like other suggested, try drilling holes and insert special steel wedges and tap away, something like this: http://aboutstone.org/conversa/arc001/msg00694.html
Drilling holes without a rotary hammer would be a challenge but you have the time.
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The guy doubted his own abilities with a jackhammer. Don't suggest something he could hurt himself with.
Steve
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The easier way is to drill holes with a rented rotary hammer and fill them with an expanding agent like www.crackamite.com I used something similar on a slab a few yrs ago and it worked great. you can Google for other varieties, should be available @ a local industrial supply outfit.
YMMV
Andrew
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Very interesting stuff. Drilling the two inch holes would be a chore, though.
Steve
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Paul MR wrote:

Many thanks for all the on-topic help. I have a much clearer idea of what I need to do and what my best options are. Actually, I enjoyed the digressions (Jarts, etc.) too. Paul in San Francisco
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Go down to the local Gym. Find about 20 very muscular gay men that lift weights. Invite them to your place and let them bang each other on the concrete. You'll end up with a pile of sand. It should be easy to find these guys in SanFrancisco.
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