Breakers compatible with Federal Pacific Stab-Lok Load Center

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On 12/23/2013 1:45 PM, Let's get it right! wrote:

UL lists #18 extension cords. UL knows they know those cords will be used on 20A circuits. #18 wire in a cord is rated 10A, too low for a 15A circuit.

The NEC explicitly allows home-made cord sets with #16 wire (13A) on 20A circuits.
The NEC allows UL listed extension cords with 15A plugs on 15 and 20A circuits.
The system is working as intended by UL and the NEC.
You are "an arrogant SOB" wanting New Orleans to enforce the NEC other than how it is clearly written.
If you don't like how it works write a code change proposal and petition UL to make changes in its standards.
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On 12/13/2013 9:44 AM, Let's get it right! wrote:

Your theory is that every device plugged into a circuit with a 20A breaker must have wiring that can handle 20A in case the device malfunctions and draws the full 20A.
It's an interesting theory though you're wrong of course. The breaker protects the internal building wiring, not each individual cord or device plugged into that wiring, each of which draws less than the total available current.
The cord or device needs its own protection. For example, at my daughter's dorm the rule is that power strips must have their own circuit breakers. She complied with this, but most cheap power strips don't have circuit breakers and the university never checks up on this.
If an unprotected device with wire that was rated for 15A had a short that caused a high current through the wiring then the 20A circuit breaker would still trip long before the wire caught fire.
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On Wednesday, April 16, 2008 4:30:05 PM UTC-4, cmyers wrote:

I would not bother. Simply get the appropriate replacement panel and do th e replacement. Many of the wires will not be long enough to reach your "te mporary" location and you will have to make the splice in the old box. And your "temporary" box will be sub panel requiring isolated ground. Of cour se you will find electricians that are fine with your plan because they wor k by the hour.
If you need to upgrade the service from outside from 100 to 200 you can do that ahead of time. There is nothing that prevents you from connecting a 1 00amp main to 200amp service. Then replace the panel. If you don't have t he money to do it, start saving until you do. It's a one day job if the ma terials are on site.
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not wanting to blunder into your p**sing match but I have had stupid customers plug 15 amp machines into 18 gauge extension cords, most notably one stapled to a carpeted wall. they used a 3 prong to 2 prong adapter too so theunit wasnt grounded.
so people can and do overload circuits.
really each and every appliance should be over current protected to whatever its normal current is...
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On 12/20/2013 3:53 PM, bob haller wrote:

AC wasn't running. Her son the handyman for apart- ment complex had used a grey cheater, and then a lamp cord extension to the power socket on the far wall.
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On 12/20/2013 2:53 PM, bob haller wrote:

A device is plugged into a "protected circuit". The "device" is inherently protected by its own design.
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just too add.
arc fault breakers can detect faults at under their rating limit and trip.
plus even high current devices can and do have wiring rated lower than say 14 gauge fr 15 amp circuit breaker.
the NEC figures whatever the wire used inside a appliance is up to the appliance manufacturer
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