Breaker keeps tripping...

We have a breaker for half the kitchen that trips frequently. Usually when the microwave is turned on. At first I though it was a bad breaker, so I replaced it. No luck. Any ideas what to look for?
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.address wrote:

Any loose connection? Tony
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On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 12:34:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.address wrote:

At the risk of being obvious, maybe the load exceeds the breaker's rating. When you say "half the kitchen", is the refrigerator included in that "half"? What else? Dishwasher, electric range, toaster, lights etc.?
And don't just assume that there is some geographical logic to the layout of circuits to the outlets. In my kitchen there were three outlet locations on the same wall, withn a space of 10 feet. The middle one was on a different circuit than the other two. If your house is sufficiently old, like mine, there could even be outlets in other rooms on the same breaker.
I have been slowly installing dedicated circuits for each significant electrical appliance. My refrigerator, window air conditioners, washer, dryer, garage shop and yes, microwave, are all on separate breakers. Pretty soon all that will be on the original circuits is lights and TVs. I think this is a good plan.
By the way, if the problem does turn out to be that there is too high a load for the breaker, don't just put in a "bigger" one. The breaker is there to prevent more current from being drawn than your wiring can handle. If your wiring is only safe for 15 amps, don't use a 20 amp breaker.
Greg Guarino
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How much stuff is on that circuit? Maybe it is simply doing it's job properly and the circuit is overloaded.
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.address wrote:

Well .... once you try a second breaker it is almost sure the line is being overloaded. My guess is something other than the microwave (maybe located almost anywhere in your home) is on the same circuit and when they are both on you get an overload. Next I would suspect a defect in the microwave causing an additional load, but they generally have internal fuses that would catch that. It could also be a wiring problem.
One other possibility. Could the breaker be a GFI breaker? If so you may have a another kind of problem.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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A good electrician?
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Look for whatever it is you're doing when it trips. Toasting toast? Perculating coffee? Is the refrigerator also on this circuit? Check the dining room as well, as diningrooms and kitchens can share the same appliance circuit.
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J > We have a breaker for half the kitchen that trips frequently. Usually J > when the microwave is turned on. At first I though it was a bad J > breaker, so I replaced it. No luck. Any ideas what to look for?
An over-current condition. A microwave will take up to ten to thirteen amps, so if something else is on the circuit (not just the outlet) the circuit breaker will trip, just as it is supposed to.
Do not replace the circuit breaker with a high value than what was originally installed. The rating of the breaker is determined by the wire, not the load.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* When it comes to cars, its tough to drive a bargain.
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RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
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Microwaves should be on their own 20 amp circuit/breaker (12 ga. wire).
(Some new kitchens can have 8 separate breakers, whereas older kitchens may be on one or two breakers...)

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Remodeled my kitchen 2 years ago. Rewired while I was at it. Before the kitchen was on 3 breakers. Now there are 2 breakers for lights . This way because one night while cooking a ballast went out and we lost all lights in the kitchen. Bad deal when making jam. Microwave, refridgerator, garbage disposal all have separate breakers. Two quad appliance ports each have their own breaker. Cook top and oven

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