breaker box install question

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... which is a Code violation and potential fire hazard, unless the receptacles are rated for use with AWG 10 conductors (or unless you used AWG 12 pigtails between that and the receptacles).
The issue is that unless the receptacle was designed for AWG 10 conductors, it's not possible to properly secure one that large under the terminal screw, and it may work loose, leading to arcing and fire.
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On 07/21/2016 08:30 PM, Jack wrote:

Same here! When I use #10 for branch circuits I use back wire receptacles and larger j-boxes.
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 5:16:25 AM UTC-4, Rusty Boldt wrote:

is

n

I ran #12 when I installed a garbage disposal and would have had a heck of a time getting #10 pulled through those bends. Thicker sizes are a pain fo r an amateur to handle. Of course pros do it every day.
Here's what I'm wondering. You're in your shed working on a project late a t night. You're surrounded by disassembled pieces, some of which you'll ne ver figure out where to put if you disturb your layout, some breakable, som e sharp. You power up your saw or other tool and trip the breaker.
Do the lights die too? Are you now in the dark unable to move without trip ping over stuff? Or does just the outlet breaker trip?
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On 07/22/2016 7:51 AM, TimR wrote: ...

Solid or stranded? I almost always pull stranded for #10 and larger...

'Pends on whether you thought ahead when wiring or no... :) Ideally, there even ought to be two light circuits, too, altho for just a small shed it's overkill. Having split circuits in a multi-story house for example means you can at least find your way to the panel in the basement instead of the whole place being dark as a parallel idea...
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And a bit of snot always helps...
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 9:50:59 AM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Solid was cheaper. ! It was my first time running a new circuit, and I learned the hard way.
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 4:16:25 AM UTC-5, Rusty Boldt wrote:

I use these, rated up to #10 copper. You can easily make 6 connections each, without a hassle. http://tinyurl.com/jrqzy9f
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On Fri, 22 Jul 2016 07:57:03 -0700 (PDT), bob_villain

If you are using the side screw and also the 2 back wire ports, you have violated the listing. They are only listed for one or the other, 2 wires per terminal max using the back wire or one per screw.
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 10:23:49 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sign me up for the violation...it makes for a compact box without wire-nuts. These are excellent construction-grade (not push-in) connectors.
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On 07/22/2016 10:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

Cam you provide a cite for that; I can't find any proscription against using all the provided terminal points on the device...
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Look at the instructions that come with the device
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On 7/22/2016 2:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have the packaging for two 20 amp commercial spec receptacles, one Leviton and one Pass and Seymour. Neither package specs the wire size or the max number of wires attached to the device.
I'd really appreciate a manufacturers link to info listing max number of wires and max wire size.
Years ago I tried to find this info and gave up. Unless the device says otherwise, if there is an open screw head I'll use it.
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On 07/22/2016 1:31 PM, anonymous wrote: ...

...
The above link to this device does list the wire size(s) and type (back terminal Cu only) but like yours I see no mention of limiting the number or which connections can be used simultaneously.
I searched for the UL reference numbers to see if they would say something but had no luck on the score, either.
Certainly on duplex outlets without the rear connections it's very common to wire outlets in series using the two sets of side screws and GFCI duplex outlets are constructed specifically with a "line" and "load" side for the purpose. Simply adding the two additional rear contacts doesn't seem to me to make sense to prevent their use if convenient and as you say, I've never seen anything saying "Don't do that!".
So, I think the "one terminal, one wire" rule is Code-compliant but I don't know how to prove it w/o a lot more effort than I've time or inclination to invest.
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From the 2014 U/L white book
Single and duplex receptacles rated 15 and 20 A that are provided with more than one set of terminals for the connection of line and neutral conductors have not been investigated to feed branch-circuit conductors connected to other outlets on a multi-outlet branch circuit, as follows: Side-wire (binding screw) terminal with its associated back-wire (.screw-actuated clamp type) terminal . Multiple conductors under a single binding screw Multiple conductors in a single back-wire hole
If these are NOT investigated, the listing does not apply so it is an unlisted use and a NEC violation.
OTOH you can use a push in and the screw.
I think the issue is that a terminal screw can only have that use. It can't be used for another purpose, like tensioning the back plate. You also run into problems that if the plate is all the way open to insert conductors, the screw may not be long enough to get a wire under it.
Using the 2 sets of terminals as a feed through has been evaluated and is legal.
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On 07/22/2016 3:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
...

...
OK, that's useful...
Of the three, only the first isn't clearly a silly thing; I'd think the first would/should be made more FAR more prominent than it is by the manufacturers although having more than the four connections for a single daisy-chain isn't all that common, one could certainly not have too much trouble in finding places where it would be useful.
I'm surprised it isn't published much more obviously than is -- although I guess on reflection that just says UL doesn't do the investigation routinely; doesn't say about any particular device so there's always the chance (however remote) they had the extra work done...not that one would expect it.
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Usually box fill would present a problem long before you filled up all the holes in a back wire receptacle.
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On 07/22/2016 3:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

Only would need a third cable to have the six wires to exceed the two sets of screws and so use two back-entry locations...w/ a deep box that's easily within fill limits...likely even be ok on standard, tho didn't double-check; certainly common number w/ 3- and 4- way switches...
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On 07/22/2016 3:59 PM, dpb wrote:

Was going to add...I'm still amazed there's nothing in manufacturer's routine lit (or even any instruction sheets that I was able to find) that says word one about it if it isn't ok (which, given the UL words one at least has to wonder about as it would be extra cost to the manufacturer to get the added cert which you wouldn't think would be routine...)
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Even using #14, 6 conductors, plus one for the grounds and 2 for the device makes 18cu/in That is a big single gang box (3x2x3.5)and if you use #12 you are talking about 20.5 cu/in and that is bigger than any standard single gang box. The only one I can think of is the 3.5" masonry box. at 21 cu/in. A standard 2.5" depth box is not even big enough for 2 #12 cables unless you have the bump out on the side.
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 1:31:24 PM UTC-5, anonymous wrote:

Spec: https://images.tradeservice.com/9ETBOIYK8205G6UU/ATTACHMENTS/DIR100097/PASSEME07915_B20_Q61_S44.pdf
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