Bosch dishwasher

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I have a Bosch dishwasher:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tS798sl4WoQ

Since there is no float, other than to prevent flooding, I assume the water fill is controlled by a timer. Is the timer in the 752738 power module at the base or at the 746432 control unit at the door? The dishwasher is overfilling and I need to change what is controlling the fill limit. Thank you for any serious ideas.
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On 12/28/2015 10:10 PM, Molly Brown wrote:

The conclusion is specious; there's no "float" in most washing machines yet they manage to have repeatable fill levels (regardless of whether they have clothes in them at the time, or not!). I.e., the float is not sitting out there for all to see! :>
Pull the dishwasher out so you can access the back/sides. You'll see a bit of plumbing and an odd-shaped plastic "container" (sorry, I don't know how else to describe it). Check it for crud, etc.
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Please indicate by giving me the part number:
http://www.searspartsdirect.com/model-number/shp65t55uc01/1794/0130000.html
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On 12/28/2015 11:04 PM, Molly Brown wrote:

A quick glance at the drawings doesn't show the "container" I've seen. On the models I've examined, there's an odd-shaped "reservoir" of sorts with the float switch inside (i.e., wires and hoses going to it -- I don't see anything with BOTH those sorts of things in the drawing).
*If*, indeed, the fill is time based, an underfill means a dirty inlet filter somewhere that is restricting the flow of water into the tub. Or, reduced water pressure for some reason. An overfill is probably just a defective fill valve (relatively inexpensive, easy repair).
There's nothing *you* are going to do to adjust a timer as it's a piece of software, not a mechanism.
If you want to know for sure that it is time based, you could disconnect the water line and listen to the water inlet valve and see when/if it "clicks open" and then "clicks closed" (with NO water flowing through it to trip a "float").
Does it throw an error code?
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Error code 15
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On 12/29/2015 4:58 AM, Molly Brown wrote:

Try:
<http://www.fixya.com/support/t8300404-bosch_dishwasher
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On Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 1:25:24 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

It does show part #531 on the drawings, "float". That wasn't hard at all.
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If it's anything like my coffee maker, there may be a water flow meter on the fill line rather than a timer. Then it wouldn't be dependent on water pressure.
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I checked to make sure there was no flow meter as well. There is nothing on the fill line.
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On 12/29/2015 1:04 AM, Molly Brown wrote:

I searched on that web page for "float" and the search returned:
1 parts found for "float"
Float Part #: 622036 Substitution: 00622036 Learn why Found in diagram: BASE ASSY
$5.99 In Stock
Susan
--


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That float is for to prevent flooding. It is on the bottom pan and only activates if the water does not shut-off and starts to flood. It is not utilized in the normal operation of the unit.
On Monday, December 28, 2015 at 11:36:10 PM UTC-8, Susan Bugher wrote:

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On Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 6:56:01 AM UTC-5, Molly Brown wrote:

How do you know that it's only for that purpose and not to detect normal water level, or maybe normal and too high conditions?
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On Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 5:41:41 AM UTC-8, trader_4 wrote:

1. I don't think any manufacturer would want standing water outside and below the tub of the dishwasher. 2. By the time the dishwasher finished washing the pan would be full or overflowing.
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On Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 11:40:35 AM UTC-5, Molly Brown wrote:

The float switch in the diagram is outside the tub and below it? That doesn't make sense. How would it work like that? If you said that the float is positioned high so that water wouldn't normally trigger it, that would make sense and then I could see that it's only an overflow sensor.

The pan is supposed to be mostly full of water when it's running.
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On 12/29/2015 11:19 AM, trader_4 wrote:

If it's like the float switch on every other DW I've owned, it is basically the reverse of the float switch on your sump pump. Hollow plastic tube/column extending up from the bottom, the top of which is above "flood level. Into this goes the float itself, a hollow cup with a long plastic stem dropping down through the column. Mounted outside the tub and below it is the switch which is controlled by the rise and fall of the float.
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 08:40:26 -0800 (PST), Molly Brown

The first and maybe the second are reasons why there needs to be a float to stop overflow, but not reasons why it couldn't also detect normal water level.
AND WHY ARE TWO LEVELS NEEDED? Why isnt' the level for not overflowing onto the floor the same level needed for operation?
Once they put a float in, they're going to use it for every purpose it will work for. My clothes washing machine has 4 or 5 water levels and the same float is used to regulate all of them, with just different sets of contacts or something.
Dishwashers use much less water than a clothes washer, so it would be absurd to use a timer to measure input, because water pressure varies from city to city, house to house, and within a house based on what else is on, washing a car, the sprinklers outside, someone filling a bathtub. A float, which directly measures what is to be measured, is the only reasonable way to control water level during operation.
That doens't mean the float itself is the problem, but if it leaked and allowed water to get inside, that's bad. Or maybe it's physically stuck and doesn't move well.
There doesn't seem to be an electriic switch on the same chart as the float (though maybe they are on other pages) but if the float directly controls a mechanical valve, maybe the valve is full of crud somehow (unlikely) but more likely it might have a small stone from when people outside worked on the pipes. Because the builder used the wrong kind of the water mains here, we have leaks every 5 years, and they warn us to flush our pipes to get the stones out. They mean for us to use the sink, not the DW or CW.
This assumes there is an electric solenoid somewhere else, which turns off the water for certain when the dw is not on. And I'm sure there is.
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 1:35:39 AM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

One reason to have two would be that if one detects normal fill and the other overfill, then two sensors would have to fail for the unit to overflow onto the floor. With one float doing both, if it gets stuck, no backup. But IDK how they typically do it either, which is why I raised the question of how she's sure that the float that's there is to detect overfill only. And I didn't understand the answer.

I agree that I doubt they just time it either. But there are other ways besides a float, could measure the flow rate, use an optical sensor, etc.
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 03:55:56 -0800 (PST), Molly Brown

Overfilling is not normal operation. I suspect it is timer controlled (belt) with backup float (suspenders).
Belt and suspenders.
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Molly Brown wrote:

There is a Youtube demo at www.repairclinic.com. You have to pull out DW to remove back cover where float chamber and float switch is located. Maybe float switch is defective.
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There is no float chamber, no float switch and no back cover.
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