Boric Acid for ants -where to get

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Drugstore. It is used to mix eyewash.
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drug store
they have boric acid powder This is higher concentration than Borax... very cheap.. buck or two.. Chuck (in SC)
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Probably cheaper to go to Lowe's or HD and buy one of the roach and ant killers that contain a high percentage of boric acid. I got one pound of a Roach and Ant mixture (dust) containing 40% boric acid at Lowe's for less than $4.00.
Ants do set up housekeeping indoors. After an extended ant problem several years ago, we found a complete nest inside a box of Reynold's foil wrap on a cupboard shelf -- queen and all. With that exception, an occasional intrusion of ants has been the result of outdoor explorers finding their way in though cracks around doors or windows in this old house. Easy to stop with outdoor bug spray around the point of entry and along their trail after cleaning up inside.
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i get it at walmart
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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i mix it with pancke syrup. get it at walart
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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RichK wrote:

Drug store/grocery store. Commonly used as an eye wash.
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Boric Acid is Boron, a mineral. You need to find a Boron mine. Go there when the miners are working and offer them money and beer. They will give you some if you bribe them well.
OR,
Go to a drug store, K-Mart, Wally Mart, or any other store that sells drugs and health care stuff.
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RichK wrote:

Drug store. Maybe supermarket.
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dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

As another poster pointed out, many drug stores have morphed into something more like old time general stores, but a decent one should still have Boric Acid. It's used as an eye wash.
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OK, this whole thread is outta control.
For crying out loud, this isnt rocket science.
Put some coca cola into a stainless steel or glass pan. Heat. Add sugar. Add corn syrup/Karo. Add some rasp jelly. Add some bacon fat or hamburger grease. Throw in a few dog or cat food kibbles. Add just a little (say a 1/4 tsp per cup) of borax/boric acid/WHATEVER BORATE YOU WANT. IT DOESN"T MATTER.
Bring it slowly to a boil. Stir.
OK, now you need:
1) Clean jars (mayo, jam, wahtevah) 2) Cotton balls or rags or something absorbent and fluffy 3) Screwdriver
Take the lid of your clean jar and stab a hole with your trusty screwdriver. Decant the gooey coke/sugar/fat/borax solution into the jar. Throw in your cotton balls or rags or fluffy absorbent material and shake it around so the crap is saturated with gook. Find your trusty ants and grab some with your hand and throw them into the jar. DO NOT KILL THEM. The more the better, but you need at least one to make it back to the colony. He will make the stink-trail back to the jar so that zillions of others can carry the borax/BORATE/WHATEVAH back to the colony and feed the queen.
If they like your recipe (whatever it is) you will need enough to feed them for 2-4 weeks.
Then they will stop coming back.
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Doing all of that sound MORE complicated than rocket science !!!!
wrote:

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RichK wrote:

There is almost always an inexpensive, generic boric acid and sugar ant bait at hardware and home stores. Works very well, and can be adapted for grease ants.
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Try a pharmacy.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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What would you mix it from?
Boron and hydrogen?

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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wrote:

Here, in great central valley of California (Mediteranian climate), I bought a white, plastic bottle, with spout-tip, of "Boric Acid Roach Killer III" (1 pound, powder), branded "PIC Corporation", www.pic-corp.com Linden, N.J.
I bought this because I could have *sworn* that the "Terro(c) Ant Killer" liquid that I had been buying, listed the active ingredient as boric acid. But now, after buying more Terro, I see the Active Ingredient is listed as:
Sodium Tetraborate Decohydrate (borax) 5.40%
Terro comes from:
Senoret Chemical Company, Inc. St. Louis, MO 63122 www.terro.com
I've had good results with the Terro stuff, when I take a few extra steps, to stave off the autumn onslaught of the small (1/8 inch), black, Argentinian (I think) invaders.
Every fall, when the first cold rain comes to the valley, these little guys panic. I think it's because they don't do well in the cold--they slow down as the temp gets down to 50F, and get really stiff and slow when it gets near 40F. A good freeze (rare here), will decimate a colony that hasn't found a protected location, and they don't seem to be adapted to that situation. And cold rain is just too much for them, so they have to find good shelter. So a nice warm, dry house is just the ticket. They can probably make do in the ground, but a house is better.
They are so small, a bread-crum is a big deal to them, and there's usually enough stuff like that on my kitchen floor to create a real harvest. And if I've gotten lazy, and left some dirty dishes lying around, I've provided them with enough bounty to cause the population of their colony to quadruple or more. I think that a lot of food causes the queens to just eat and poop eggs--fast. An unprotected, outside garbage can can cause a colony of thousands to blow up into millions, spinning off new colonies that need someplace to go--like my house.
These little buggers don't do the normal fly and mate thing, they mate right in the colony, and multiple queens are the norm. And they seem to have no predators in this area, except maybe for me. Give them ample food, and they'll reproduce like... well... people! I *suspect* that a sudden, unlimited increase in their food supply can cause a doubling of the colony population in 5 days. An r-rated species, on steroids! That's part of their species survival strategy--they form huge colonies, food permitting, spin off additional queens and colonies, and remain cooperative amongs the colonies. They seem to feast on anything that I eat, be it sweet or fat, milk or honey, bread or cereal. Not so sure about vegetables, tho. Here, they are one of the most invasive, exotic ant species. Even tho it seems impossible for a human to feel any kind of bite from them, they will eliminate every other ant species wherever they are able to make a living. I've read that their communal colonies can stretch accross counties, and that they will invade other ant colonies and even bee-hives, killing or driving off their inhabitants by sheer numbers, sometimes losing *millions* of their own in the process. I have no qualms about trying to exterpate them wherever I can.
One time, they were making tracks across my garage floor, from one corner to the opposite--about twenty feet of trail, about 6 or 8 abreast, on average. I decided to experiment by vacuuming them up with the shop-vac. I sucked up the entire trail, repeating the process about every two (waking) hours for three days. That's when I noticed the odor in the garage. When I popped the lid off the shop-vac, it was about six inches deep in these tiny buggers, and the stench was amazing! Now I wish I had scouped some into a small, graduated container, and counted the contents. Then I could have done some more word to get a real estimate of the number in that shop-vac. If I try to imagine how many would be in a cubic inch, by first imagining how many there would be in the top 1/10th of the cubic inch, I'd guess around 5,000/ci. The inside diameter of the vac canister is about 16.5". So 16.5" x 6" gives a volume of a little over 408 ci. So that's something like 2,042,000 ants. The track accross the garage was still going, not quite as strong as at first. That's the first time that I'm aware of having killed over 2 million of anything.
So here's what I do.
First of all, I try to make sure that I'm not providing them with *any* food. I periodically check the garbage can, and if I see Argentinians getting into it, I spray it down with soapy water, and the same for any trails leading away from it, for as far as I can follow them. I *try* to keep my house clean, but when I see the first storm approaching in the fall, I go on a real cleaning binge. Cereal boxes and the like get moved into the fridge (they can chew thru the cardboard and plastic bags to get the cereal).
When I see the first intruders, I put out the boric acid-based (or borax-based) baits as close to the point of entry as I can get it.
I try to make sure that the *only* edible thing they can find on my property is either a natural food source, or my baits. And if it's cold and pouring rain, they probably aren't going to be getting any natural foods, especially if they've moved their colonies into my house walls or attic.
I'm just starting to experiment with making my own baits, so have no data to offer there. A few years ago, the Terro folks started offering their mix in exquisitely-designed plastic traps. The design is good, because it limits the air-flow past the liquid, and extends the dry-out time. They also have a perfect little ramp for the ants to walk up, to get into the bait-well. That's probably a moot point, as these ants will find anything that tastes good, anywhere you put it, except for the refridgerator. I think the traps cost around $5 US for a box of six traps. Being a tight-wad, I'm going to try rinsing out the used traps and putting my own mix in. Quite a few ants will be so overtaken with the bounty of the bait that they seem to drown in the liquid, and the stuff tends to dry out a bit over time, so it's a real pain to get them cleaned up. I've done this to a couple of traps so far, but they both ended up leaking, so I might just go back to putting the mix on plastic lids, squares of cardboard, or whatever is available. It's also quite a trick to get the liquid *into* the traps.
With factory Terro traps, used against a colony of Argentinians without a good food supply, the results can come fast. I've seen the traps get swarmed with thousands of ants, and within around three hours, I can tell that something is amis--they just aren't moving like they were at first. After twelve hours, the numbers are starting to drop noticably. After 24 hours, there's just a slow trickle, and they're not scouting the rest of the house anymore. At one week, there are still a few dozen ants going for the bait, but no ants in the rest of the house, and the ones going for the bait are not moving so good.
This fall, I managed to almost completely keep them out of my larders, and quickly put the baits out when assault started. Just putting out two of the Terro traps (one at each of the two entry-points) halted the invasion, and I think the colony involved must've gotten hit pretty hard by the poison--it's been a month since I've seen one anywhere but in the traps, or going directly to/from the traps.
Geez, how'd I get started on this, anyway? ;-)
Bottom line for this species: don't let 'em eat anything but poisoned bait!
--
tbl

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Several others have said where to get boric acid. So, I'll change the subject again. I've had excellent results with liquid ant bait from www.gardensalive.com which is a blue liquid, comes in about two ounce dropper bottle. I'd had a pest control company tell me that carpenter ants come dropping off the trees, nearly impossible to control, and it would take several hundred dollars of spraying and repeat applications. Less than a bottle of liquid ant bait later, and I don't have carpenter ants any more. And I got to keep my several hundred dollars.
Their pantry pest traps work nicely on Indian mealworms, too.
--

Christopher A. Young
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try a drugstore. goodluck!
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Rich. I find it at the drug store. Mix with equal parts sugar or cormeal. Keep away from Children and pets Though Best Regards Anthony
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