Bootlegging Lightbulbs

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sparechange@the_net.com wrote:

It seems the media can't report this story right. Incandescents aren't banned.
A couple recent treads from this newsgroup:
http://tinyurl.com/3fxexo (and other posts by Paul Eldridge - what the regulation actually is)
and http://tinyurl.com/449mrm [Don Klipstein]
--
bud--

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sparechange@the_net.com wrote in message ...

With the drug lords killing people in the streets of Mexico, I'll take my chances here. ;-)
Cheri
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On May 20, 7:00 am, sparechange@the_net.com wrote:

Grand idea. Would you bring me a vented gas can while you're there?
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On May 20, 2:16 pm, The Reverend Natural Light

I hear the smugglers hide cans of R12 inside the bags cocaine...
Mark
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 06:00:23 -0500, sparechange wrote:
Slow starting bulbs last longer. If you get one that comes on right away, its probably a cheaper one that wont last. Probably...
I agree with most of what you said though. They do start slow and are dim and don't have the whitest light. But regular bulbs are cheap as hell and burn out unacceptable fast. The whole situation is crap and you know why...
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And I've still never seen a CFL that took longer than 2 or 3 seconds to start. But then, I don't use them in freezing cold places.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Maybe there's a market for a bulb pre-heater? Something similar to "standby" on the TV or computer. Small heating coil using no more than, oh, 50 watts to keep the 15-watt CFL at a reasonable temperature so that the CFL could put out as much light as a 60 watt incandescent bulb.
No, wait ...
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There are longer-lasting regular bulbs with only mild compromise in energy efficiency. Best example I can think of is Philips "/99" series - available at bulbs.com. Those are rated to last 2500 hours.
Longer life requires greater compromise in energy efficiency due to lower filament temperature. The energy efficiency of the famous "century bulbs" is well known to be especially lousy. You can get your own "century bulbs" with similarly lousy energy efficiency by getting 230V ones - bulbs.com has them. A 200 watt 230V one draws close to 75 watts at 120 volts, and produces somewhat more light than an ordinary 25 watt lightbulb. All the famous "century bulbs" have energy efficiency no better.
As for a whiter CFL - there is now a wide range of color choices.
If you want an incandescent approximation but found ones to be too purplish/pinkish or too greenish, you can make an adjustment in that area by switching brands, since some brands have different philosophies than others in which direction is most tolerable for straying from "incandescent" in color.
If you want slightly whiter and leaning to the purplish/pinkish side as opposed to greenish, get Sylvania 3000K, the most-standard CFLs at Lowes.
If you want whiter still but warm, get 3500K ones. Those include most Sylvania "Daylight" (as opposed to icy cool that everyone else means by "daylight") (available at Lowes), or N:Vision "Bright White" at Home Depot.
Whiter still - at risk of "dreary gray effect" - 4100 K ones of the Westpointe brand at some True Value hardware stores.
You can go higher. N:Vision "Daylight" ones at Home Depot are 5500K - icy cold pure white to very slightly bluish. I have seen 6500K ones, almost definitely slightly bluish - GE brand at Target, and IIRC Sylvania ones at Lowes.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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As it turns out, incandescents that will meet the mandates that take effect in 2012 and 2014 are already available. The hurdles imposed are low enough so that lightbulbs with about 40% of the efficiency of better compact fluorescents can meet these mandates until 2020.
Ones I already saw on the market are Philips "Halogena energy saver", 70 watt and 40 watt units. The 70 watt one produces about as much light as a 1500 hour "soft white" 100 watt incandescent, or about 92-93% as much light as a "standard" 750 hour 100 watt incandescent, or about as much light as a good 23 watt or a poor 28 watt CFL. The 40 watt one similarly compares to 60 watt incandescents and 13-15 watt CFLs (and the dimmest 18 watt non-dollar-store CFLs). These appear to me to have more efficiency than usual for halogens (of such voltage, wattage and life expectancy) by using "HIR" technology and maybe also more-premium main fill gas inert ingredient.

Often but not always fall short - so use one size bigger CFL. If a 13-15 watt one fails to achieve what a 60 watt incandescent did for you, use an 18 watt one.

The various brands do differ in philosophy as to greenishness-vs-pinkishness and many brands give many color temperature options.
Among 2700K spirals 23 watts or less:
Want more greenish (or whitish and yellowish as you may see) - use Philips. Want more yellowish (greenish and warmer) - use Feit Electric. Want one level less greenish (or more purplish/pinkish) - use GE, common at Target and other places. Want more purplish still and also whiter (I find this "harsh") - use Sylvania 3000 K, common at Lowes.
Want something whiter but still warm? Get 3500K ones, such as Sylvania ones (often they call that "Daylight", as opposed to other brands using that term for icy cool colors), or N:Vision "Bright White" (Home Depot).
Higher wattages (mostly over 23 watts) in my experience tend to be less yellow-greenish and more purplish-pinkish.

On average they actually reduce mercury contribution to the environment, because on average the amount of coal burning required to produce the "coal share" of electricity saved by a CFL over it lifetime releases more mercury than a CFL contains.
If you want to improve upon that, dispose of your dead CFLs by means recommended for your locality by www.lamprecycle.org.

Most complaints I hear of actual flaming come from the dollar store stool specimens. Most of those lack the UL listing that I find to be the norm for "lightbulbs" that include ballasts (with exception of mercury lamps ballasted by an incandescent lamp filament). Heck, one of the dollar store "brands" had one model recalled for failure to have its plastic construction of the flame-retardant plastic. I would not be surprised if many other dollar store "stool specimens" were/are similarly faulty, given lack of regulatory action to force them to meet light output claims in lumens, and to make such claims ("general purpose" lightbulbs have to state light output in lumens ["specialty" ones such as colored, reflector, oven, nightlight, decorative, etc. lack that requirement]). All the "spectacular failures" for "better brands" that I saw better documentation of were from the early years of the spiral ones, and they did not ignite since proper flame retardant plastic appears to me to be necessary to gain that UL listing.

Less true now - I see dimmable ones at Target now. I suspect the mandates will force an increase in availability of dimmable ones soon.

Outdoor ones do quite well there once they warm up.

I have heard of technology to combat that - I expect market forces to bring that to market soon.
Meanwhile, the warmup issues are worse with ones that have outer bulbs (including outdoor ones). For CFL usage in non-chilly areas, go for CFLs with bare tubing.

That is an application for incandescents.
Keep in mind that only specific incandescents will be banned in 2012 and 2014. Most "specialty" types get around the ban. So do ones with light output outside a certain range that mainly affects wattages 40-100 watts. It apears to me that 200 watt and probably many 150 watt incandescents will be unaffected by the 2012 and 2014 bans.
<SNIP>

In my experience, most CFLs either meet their claims of life expectancy or only mildly/moderately fall short. Most last over 4,000 operating hours in my experience.

Since only specific incandescents will be banned effective 2012 and 2014, and improved models that have high enough efficiency to get around the 2012/2014 ban are already on the market with more already in the pipeline, I see only minor bootleg market.

Few cars nowadays have carbs. If you have one of those, I would not give up before trying turpentine.

I thought stuff like this for toilets already went through in a lot of areas. Now I see many 1.6 gallon/flush toilets that work as well as toilets ever did. Sadly these, like airbags for cars, needed a government mandate to come into existence.

I seem to think that both industry lobbyists and common voters will not let anything that drastic occur.

$1,000 a case, with a case probably having 48 of them? That's a little over 4 times the price of the 3,000 hour Philips "Halogena Energy Saver" at quantity-of-2 retail price at Home Depot. That price will certainly drop when GE brings their similar products to market in a year or two.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

I have not been entirely happy with the color of CFL I have tried. Your list should help.
When I was looking at several manufacturer sites recently, all the CFLs had a CRI [color quality] of 82. Any idea why they were all the same? IIRC 82 is not particularly good.
--
bud--

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Actually, 82 is pretty good. And it is not a measure of the overall color of the light, but of the way the light renders colored objects.
All common CFLs use the same basic phosphor formulation known as "triphosphor". Their spectra look alike, except for minor differences between the different rated color temperatures.
Some may actually often achieve 80 or 81, while others may actually often achieve 83. This number for a CFL is generally unaffected by color temperature bing higher or lower, and is only slightly affected if the color is, by normal extents, on the greenish side or the purplish side (the two sides of the "blackbody locus" curve on a chromaticity diagram).
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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