Bookcase headboard

After hunting for a decent bookcase headboard, I decided to build my own. The decent ones (I found) were expensive.
I was able to do a decent job given I only used a router, a circular saw and a drill. I've still got some finishing touches to put on it.
I would like to know if anyone would recommend a good stain to put on it..? Also I'd like to build a platform bed base to go with it - the one with the drawers underneath. But I think that'd be a bit ambitous given my limited woodworking tool collection..
I've never built drawers in my life. Are there any free plans floating around for a base like that? I guess I could do what I did for the bookcase HB and go to a store and lift some measurements. :>)
Any help would be appreciated..thanks..
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On Sun, 13 Jul 2008 15:28:17 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Is this PT wood?
Search webtv for the plans.
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what kind of wood
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I think it's called white pine..? I used off the shelf at lowes precut..the better pieces.. No PT...
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

You'll want to sand uniformly, then use a sanding sealer before staining. W/O the sealer, pine is very prone to blotching; the sealer minimizes the problem.
Any wiping oil stain will be fine although I would recommend against any that are labelled as "stain and finish" or polyurethane. After that, a poly varnish or even a wiping oil depending on the sheen desired.
--


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Why would anyone want to stain PT wood? Or for that matter why would they use PT wood for a homemade furniture project (at least on the exposed parts)?
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On Sun, 13 Jul 2008 18:14:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Why would they use Web TV, just beats the shit out of me!?
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

For "drawers" under a bed, don't use drawer guides; use wheels.
Keep this in mind, too, as you're building your platform supports. Mattresses plus people plus vigorous activity equals significant stress. My platform Queen-size bed support is three 2x12s and 3/4" plywood platform (no drawers).
I got a new California-type female (delivered right to the door). I'm 190, she's 130.
We broke it.
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For "drawers" under a bed, don't use drawer guides; use wheels. Keep this in mind, too, as you're building your platform supports. Mattresses plus people plus vigorous activity equals significant stress. My platform Queen-size bed support is three 2x12s and 3/4" plywood platform (no drawers). I got a new California-type female (delivered right to the door). I'm 190, she's 130. We broke it. -------------------------
Maybe I'll just attach one of those stock metal bed frames. The most important part was assembling the headboard. I've never had a problem with one of those metal ones..
But now that you mention it, I've busted a couple of the more elaborate ones (with some help as well)...
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HeyBub wrote:

My California king size water bed has six drawers all on 32" drawer slides which work well and which I like. Support for the bed is a grid of 3/4 particle board which forms the drawer compartments. There is 1/2" fir ply laying on top of the grid. I built it more than 20 years ago, all is still fine.
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dadiOH
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snip
Wow, its 1980 again. Minwax stain is decent as are most major brands at the local paint store. If the wood is pine, a precondition helps give a more even application.
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On Jul 13, 2:28pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Use a pre stain sealer first on pine, Bix makes one, or you thin down shellac. Pine will not stain well without a sealer.
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