book binding how to repair

I have a paperback book that the pages are coming out in chunks and I want to repair the book. It has the authors signature in it and other stuff
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"eric r frith" ( snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net) writes:

Consult an antique bookseller before you do anything. If the book has value because of the signature, you might be better off leaving it in original condition as much as possible.
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eric r frith wrote:

Haul it to your local library, and ask them if they'll show you how to do it. (Some will, some won't).
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First of all, it's pretty rare for a paperback to be worth much of anything, doubly so if it's in bad shape. So I don't know if you're expecting some great treasure at the end, but don't get your hopes up... If it is by chance somewhat valuable, you might want to contact a bookbindery about fixing it. Your local library probably can give you a lead on that.
Anyway, all sorts of glues have been used for bookbinding in the past, with all sorts of results. "Perfect bound" paperbacks usually use a flexible hot melt glue. You can actually use a typical glue gun with adequate results. It helps to rough up the edges of the paper a little first to give something for the glue to grip on. A flexible contact cement can also work - glue the binding, glue the paper edges, wait, and press together. There are even white glues that are suitable - not the typical Elmer's glue, which becomes brittle when dry, but ones that stay flexible.
If you do decide to try it yourself, practice first, of course!
--
Y.

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snipped-for-privacy@iname.com (Yasashii Arbaito) wrote:

True
If you think its valuable, contact a dealer in rare books first. If it is worth anything you'll destroy its value if you repair it. Doesn't anyone watch "Antiques Roadshow"?

Very doubtful.
The following presumes the book isn't worth anything but you still want to repair it.

Been there, done that. Don't do it. Hot glue is not flexible when it sets and it will crack very easily.

That's true if you do it the right way (below) too.

No. Most contact cements won't dry properly. Don't do it.

Now you've got it. You need to go to an achival store. One that specializes in selling supplies to libraries and bookbinders and schools. (IIRC the one I contacted was Taos (or Laos, or something like that) in NYC) They'll sell you a half pint or so of a special white glue that's used for perfect binding. You cut the old spine off the book (about 1/16 of an inch--requires a guillotine, try Staples) or remove it with a Surform and then put it in a vice with just the back showing and cut alternating cross lines with a hacksaw about 1/16 deep. Then apply a coat of the glue, follow with either fiberglass tape (not the sticky stuff although I have used drywall mesh tape without an apparent problem; I suppose you could used carbon filament too) and then another coat of glue. Wait for it to dry and then cut off the surplus. If you want a nice spine you can do a reasonable job on the computer, cut to size and then glue with the same bookbinding glue.

I've done a fair few computer manuals this way.
-- Patrick Riley
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